Plato's Theory of Ethics: The Moral Criterion and the Highest Good

By R. C. Lodge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
MIND AND ITS VALUE

IN a number of passages, mind is said to occupy a somewhat peculiar position in relation to the other values recognized by Platonism, and in fact to be superior to them, one and all. The aim of the present chapter, therefore, is to investigate, in the first place, the meaning of the term "mind"1 in the Dialogues, and then, by comparing it with other typical values, to discover why this peculiar position of superiority is assigned to mind. We shall begin, then, by putting together all the Platonic statements which refer to the nature and function of mind, using this term in the broadest and most general sense that we find in the Dialogues, and shall proceed empirically, passing by due gradations from the many to the one, in the hope of thus reaching a conclusion which may reasonably be regarded as final.

For the typical Post-Heraclitean Hellenic thinker, physical nature is obviously a texture of motions or, perhaps we should say, of moving particles, A, B, C. . . . . B receives motion from impact with an already moving A and passes on the motion, by impact, to C, and the general texture of the physical universe is thus an affair of motions received and transmitted by impact. To the scientific Greek mind, fertile in hypotheses, this situation suggested a great number of lines of fruitful research and speculation. Amongst others, the question as to the source of the motions whose interplay constituted the physical drama, was asked and answered in a variety of ways. The answer which appealed most to the Platonic Socrates, as to Aristotle later, was the suggestion, ascribed to Anaxagoras,2 that mind is somehow the fons et origo of the whole business, the efficient, formal, and final cause of the entire physical drama. At present, we are concerned with the efficient cause only. The efficient spring, or moving cause of the motions whose transmissions constitute the physical world, is mind. The motion ascribed to mind is

-291-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Plato's Theory of Ethics: The Moral Criterion and the Highest Good
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 562

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.