The Economics of Communism: With Special Reference to Russia's Experiment

By Leo Pasvolsky | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

IT is undoubtedly true that no peace that is real will come to the civilized world, until Russia finds herself and is restored alike to sanity of domestic action and to the place in the sisterhood of nations which is normal to her great resources and to the energy and thrift of her vast population.

Her present alleged rulers admit that their Communist régime cannot succeed unless it spreads to other lands and becomes a world movement. They have spared neither money nor effort to bring other countries into the fold of the Third International, but with scanty success. Indeed, it now plainly appears that the great inert, majority in Russia itself opposes the methods of Communism as well as its theory, and that Lenin and his fellows control Russia only so far as they can reach with their army. The statement that their own success depends on the, support of other nations is equivalent to an admission of that failure which all the world outside of Russia--save a few blind advocates--clearly sees.

It is of more present interest and future value to consider how and when the real Russia will assert itself, and what may then be done by us in her behalf. Her former economic organization is destroyed, but her huge undeveloped resources remain, and she still has latent the power to feed a large part of the world. It will be

-xiii-

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