An Introduction to Economic Geography - Vol. 1

By Wellington D. Jones; Derwent S. Whittlesey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
GROUND AND SURFACE WATERS OF THE LANDS

GROUND WATER AND ITS USES
1. What is the source of the water in wells?
2. Why must wells be dug much deeper at some places than at others? Do you suppose one can dig anywhere and strike water?
3. Why does the depth at which ground water is to be found differ at different places? See Figure 295.
4. Why does the depth of water in wells vary from season to season?
5. It is said that in most parts of the eastern half of the United States, wells dug during the pioneer period had to be deepened after the forests were cleared and the land was under cultivation. Suggest reasons for this fact.
6. For what purpose are wells most commonly used in humid regions? What additional uses are made of well water in arid and semiarid regions?
7. Which well in Figure 296 probably is safe for domestic use and which probably is not safe? Why?
8. In arid regions, where streams from mountain areas "dry up" on the plains, shallow wells dug some miles beyond the ends of the streams may strike water. What undoubtedly is the source of the water thus obtained? Does all the water in the streams sink into the ground?
9. Water is obtained not only from dug wells, all of which are relatively shallow, but also from drilled wells, some of which are hundreds of feet deep. From certain of these wells water flows out at the surface. The cross-section (Fig. 297) illustrates conditions which give rise to such a well. From a study of the diagram state the conditions requisite to a flowing well.
10. In some districts flowing artesian wells yield less water than formerly. "The Artesian Water Supply of Eastern South Dakota'' (pp. 277-278) suggests reasons for such decreased flow, undesirable consequences of a decrease, and means of remedying the situation.

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