Methodology in Basic Genetics

By Walter J. Burdette | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Genetic mechanisms have been clarified in the past by examining heredity in diverse groups of organisms with greater knowledge emergent from comparative scrutiny than would have been possible otherwise. This experience now provides one means for evaluating reproduction at the molecular level. The gene itself has yielded to probing, so that the functional unit is now regarded in terms of codons, cistrons, pseudo-alleles, etc.; and, since recombination has not proved always to be a reciprocal event, copy-choice and genie conversion conform to certain analytical experience. Studies on the genetics of microorganisms have been particularly useful in demonstrating episomal relationships and bringing about freedom from conceptual conformity suggested by the more stylized means of fertilization, meiosis, and mitosis in higher metazoa. A beginning has also been made in determining how genic action leads to phenotype and events in differentiation. For example, recent work on invertebrate hormones suggests that humoral mechanisms may be involved in the differential initiation of genic action and transfer of coded message to cytoplasm with enhancement of the rate of protein synthesis at the ribosomal level. As the genetic code is confirmed for individual organisms and biochemical events, mechanisms of heredity can be analyzed with a degree of precision not possible in the past. The methods for manipulating organisms, chromosomes, and biological events to the advantage of the investigator are essential ingredients for taking advantage of these opportunities for research in an era of exceedingly rapid progress in acquiring genetic information. The arrangement adopted for presentation of pertinent methodology in this volume combines a survey of the present status of knowledge and methods with discussions by qualified investigators. The material has been organized into presentations about mutation and recombination, gene-protein relationships, and cytoplasmic inheritance, with individual chapters devoted to the status of these subjects in viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi, and Drosophila. It is hoped that the collection will be of value from instructive and heuristic as well as historic viewpoints.

WALTER J. BURDETTE Chairman, Genetics Study Section

Salt Lake City, Utah March, 1963

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Methodology in Basic Genetics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.