The Big Five: Arms Control Decision-Making in the Soviet Union

By Aleksandr' G. Savel'Yev; Nikolay N. Detinov et al. | Go to book overview

even here one had to choose the lesser evil; nothing less than the fate of the ABM Treaty was at stake. Still, the "new political thinking" in this particular instance proved to be strong enough and undoubtedly contributed to enhancing trust between the Soviet Union and the United States.

The end of the "Krasnoyarsk epic" is symbolic for the times in which we live. Early in 1992, Izvestia reported that the Krasnoyarsk authorities had asked the Ministry of Defense not to eliminate completely the structures of the radar, since they could be used in the civilian economy. More recently it was reported that a furniture factory was to be opened on the former radar site. Konverisiya (defense conversion) is obviously gaining momentum.


Notes
1.
The Soviet Side continued to make this reference throughout the Defense and Space Talks as "the ABM Treaty, as signed in 1972, and of unlimited duration." It was almost as if the Soviets could not say "the ABM Treaty [period]" without the other words somehow tumbling out. This both puzzled and delighted the American Side, who could always respond by pointing out that the Soviets (and Americans) had agreed to a major modification of that treaty in the Protocol of 1974. In my research for this book, I discovered the real story. The backstoppers in Moscow sent instructions to the Delegation with the "as signed in 1972" wording in them. The Delegation saw the potential problem and cabled Moscow. Moscow, however, could admit no error, because, after all, the backstoppers know all (regardless of nationality). As a result the Delegation was curtly told to execute their instructions as written. Once said, there was no going back. Consequently, the error was perpetuated and became a part of both the lexicon of the talks and a "light motif in the dance of the Defense and Space Talks," in the words of U.S. DST Negotiator, Ambassador David J. Smith. U.S. Ed.
2.
The Standing Consultative Commission or SCC was the U.S.-Soviet group established and charged by the ABM Treaty with considering all questions of compliance, providing information to

-109-

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The Big Five: Arms Control Decision-Making in the Soviet Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1- The Historical Background 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2- The Politburo Commission For The Supervision of The Negotiations 15
  • Notes 30
  • 3- The Big Five and The Small Five 31
  • Note 42
  • 4 - The Salt II Talks: The Decision-Making Mechanism in Action 43
  • Notes 53
  • 5- "Euromissiles" and The Principle of Equal Security 55
  • Notes 68
  • 6- The Start Negotiations And the Final Period Of Superpower Confrontation 71
  • Notes 80
  • 7- The Return to The Negotiations: the Prelude To Perestroyka 83
  • Notes 94
  • 8- The Krasnoyarsk Affair 95
  • Notes 109
  • 9- Perestroyka and the Further Refinement of The Decision-Making Mechanism 111
  • Note 122
  • 10- Medium-Range Nuclear Weapons Negotiations: Was the "Zero Option" Really So Bad? 123
  • Notes 139
  • 11- The Start Treaty: Who Made Concessions to Whom? 141
  • Note 150
  • 12- The Difficult Path to The Start Treaty 151
  • 13- Defense and Space Issues: A Field for Future Negotiations? 163
  • Notes 182
  • 14- The Big Five: from Its Birth To Its Death 183
  • Note 192
  • 15- Reflections 193
  • Index 195
  • About the Authors and Editor 205
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