War and American Women: Heroism, Deeds, and Controversy

By William B. Breuer | Go to book overview

Notes and Sources

CHAPTER 1. A NIGHTMARE IN VIETNAM
1.
"History of the WAF Directorate," Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama.
2.
Ibid.
3.
The Geneva Conventions provide for the humane treatment of prisoners and wounded men in wartime. Also set forth are the proper markings of hospitals and medical transports with red crosses. The first Geneva Convention, or Treaty, was signed by most countries in 1864, and new provisions were added in 1906, 1929, and 1949.
4.
Eunice Splawn eventually retired from the Army as a full colonel.
5.
A War Remembered by editors of Boston Publishing Company, Boston, 1986. p. 40.
6.
Ibid.
8.
Other Hollywood celebrities who went to Vietnam to entertain the servicemen and -women included: Lana Turner, Dale Evans, Julie Andrews, Jill St. John, Joey Heatherton, Nancy Sinatra, Anna Maria Alberghetti, Kay Stevens, Janis Paige, Ann Sydney, Ann-Margret, Ursula Andress, Fran Jeffries, Mary Martin, Carroll Baker, Anita Bryant, Racquel Welch.
9.
Captain Harry H. Dinsmore was awarded the sea service's second highest medal for valor, the Navy Cross. The author was unable to find if the women nurses had also been decorated.
10.
Truong Nhu Tang made his remarks after defecting and taking up residence in Paris.

CHAPTER 2. FEMALE TRAILBLAZERS
1.
A yeoman in the U.S. Navy is one who largely performs clerical duties.
2.
John Ellis, Eye-Deep in Hell ( New York: Pantheon, 1976), p. 67.
3.
After World War I, Paul von Hindenberg was elected the first president of the German Republic.
4.
The League of Nations was dissolved on April 18, 1946, and replaced by the United Nations.
5.
In 1949 Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the U.S. commander in the Central Pacific in World War II, was quoted by a journalist as saying that Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan had been picked up by the Japanese (and presumably executed as spies). Nimitz did not elaborate.

-231-

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