Creativity in Context: Update to the Social Psychology of Creativity

By Teresa M. Amabile; Mary Ann Collins et al. | Go to book overview

field, defined as the group(s) of people whose presence supports and influences the structure of the domain, is responsible for the selection and retention of ideas. Creative individuals not only produce ideas and communicate them to the field, but they also may bring pressure upon the field to transform the domain in some way. Like other theorists, Feldman, Csikszentmihalyi, and Gardner assert that the historical/social context of a discovery is crucial for understanding creativity.


Summary

In recent years, several theorists (including us) have elaborated upon and gone far beyond our original componential model. Formal proposals concerning the influence of social factors have extended beyond the immediate social environment to the historical context of the individual, the field, and the society. Moreover, important advances have been made by reversing perspective and considering the influence that creative behavior can have upon the social environment of a field, a society, or an entire culture.

Besides the cosmetic changes in the basic graphical presentation of our theoretical model, we have undertaken more substantive revisions as well. The most important is the revision of the intrinsic motivation principle. Although we still recognize the critical importance of intrinsic motivation to creativity, we have recently discovered that certain forms of extrinsic motivation--which we call synergistic extrinsic motivators--do not necessarily detract from intrinsic motivation and creativity. Rather, these motivators, such as rewards that enable the individual to undertake an exciting project, may actually increase creativity. We suggest that "pure" intrinsic motivation may be most crucial at those heuristic stages of the creative process where novelty is most needed (such as idea generation), but that synergistic extrinsic motivation may play a useful role if it appears at those more algorithmic stages of the process where outcome appropriateness is determined (such as idea validation).

Our current theoretical statement also includes a considerable expansion of the range of social-environmental influences that are considered. Although the original statement ( Amabile, 1983a, 1983b) focused primarily on factors that can negatively influence an individual's creativity in any setting, our current presentation of factors includes both negative and positive influences in organizational as well as individual work settings.

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creativity in Context: Update to the Social Psychology of Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.