The Arts and Human Development: A Psychological Study of the Artistic Process

By Howard Gardner | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

CHAPTER 1
Page 1. Examples of the earliest studies of children are found in W. Dennis (ed.), Historical Readings in Developmental Psychology ( New York: Appleton-Century- Crofts, 1972). Perhaps the best known observations of infants during that era were those of Charles Darwin, "A Biographical Sketch of an Infant," Mind, 1877, 2, 286-294. For a collection of early observations on children, see W. Kessen (ed.), The Child ( New York: Wiley, 1965).
Page 1. Among Gesell's writings are A. Gesell et al., The Child from Five to Ten ( New York: Harper, 1946); The First Five Years of Life ( New York: Harper, 1940).
Page 2. S. Bijou and D. Baer present their views of child development in Child Development: Universal Stage of Infancy ( New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1965), Vol. 2. 83. G. Terrell point of view is expressed in "The Need for Simplicity in Research," Child Development, 1958, 29, 308.
Page 2. Critical discussions of the behaviorist point of view can be found in N. Chomsky, "Review of B. F. Skinner's Verbal Behavior," Language, 1959, 35, 26-58; W. Köhler, Gestalt Psychology ( New York: Liveright, 1929); J. Fodor , Psychological Explanation ( New York: Random House, 1968); and many other philosophical and psychological writings.
Page 3. Examples of eclectic theorizing in developmental psychology include D. Berlyne , Structure and Direction in Thinking ( New York: Wiley, 1965); J. Langer , Theories of Development ( New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1969); P. H. Wolff, "The Developmental Psychologies of Jean Piaget and Psychoanalysis," Psychological Issues, 1960, 2; P. H. Wolff, "Cognitive Considerations for a Psychoanalytic Theory of Language Acquisition," in R. Holt (ed.), Motives and Thought ( New York: International Universities Press, 1967), pp. 299-343.
Page 3. Freud's comments on children and women are found in "Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex," in A. A. Brill (ed.), The Basic Writings of Sigmund Freud ( New York: Random House, 1938), pp. 592-593.
Page 4. Freud's further views on children are found in the volume edited by Brill, for example on page 596. See also "Sexual Theories of Children," Standard Edition ( London: Hogarth, 1959), Vol. 9, pp. 209-226; and "Sexual Enlightenment of Children,"ibid., Vol. 9, pp. 129-141.

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The Arts and Human Development: A Psychological Study of the Artistic Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures, Tables, and Works of Art viii
  • Preface and Overview xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction to the Paperback Edition xxi
  • One - The Relationship of Art to Human Development 1
  • Two - The Three Systems in Animals and Infants 53
  • Three - From Mode to Symbol 88
  • Four - The World of Symbols 125
  • Summary 172
  • Five - Experimental Research on Artistic Development 178
  • Six - Achieving Mastery 242
  • Concluding Remarks 292
  • Seven - The Relationship of the Arts to Science, Illness, and Truth 301
  • Bibliographical Notes 351
  • Author Index 383
  • Subject Index 389
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