Outstanding School Administrators: Their Keys to Success

By Frederick C. Wendel; Fred A. Hoke et al. | Go to book overview

1
EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY

This chapter presents statements of educational philosophy made by participants in Project Success. The statements are representative of the beliefs, values, and positions successful administrators espouse. As you read through the comments, you will note that many different topics are addressed and that no single set of ideas emerges. The world of education is broad enough to accommodate divergent views, and perhaps only extreme views would be unacceptable. For example, educators might find the statement "I believe that boys should not be taught to sew" a little odd but not repugnant. Statements about more compelling issues, however, can divide faculties, educators from their critics, and members of one camp from another. You may find few new or startling ideas in this chapter, but you may be struck by the clarity of thought, the intensity of belief, and the firmness with which administrators hold onto their beliefs, values, and principles.

The administrators who responded to Project Success were not asked, directly or indirectly, to express their philosophical values, views, and beliefs. They were asked to write what they believed contributed to their success as school administrators. In a follow-up letter, administrators were asked to expand upon their statements, and many did so.

How, then, were their values, views, and beliefs categorized? First, their responses were placed, alphabetically, into six notebooks. Second, each response was read and statements of belief were identified. Statements were screened with a definite principle in mind: "I believe . . ." and similarly worded statements were considered to be statements of educational philosophy. Thus, emphasis was placed upon assertions of one's personal beliefs. Third, quotations of beliefs were transcribed onto a disk file and coded with an index entry. Finally, the index entries were categorized under several broad headings and incorporated into the text of this chapter. Consequently, you may or may not agree with the placement of some

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Outstanding School Administrators: Their Keys to Success
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Educational Philosophy 1
  • Summary 43
  • References 44
  • 2 - Values 45
  • Summary 57
  • References 58
  • 3 - Visionary Leadership 60
  • Summary 68
  • References 69
  • 4 - Institutional Leadership 71
  • Summary 79
  • References 79
  • 5 - Commitment 80
  • Summary 86
  • 6 - Interpersonal Relations 87
  • Summary 107
  • References 107
  • 7 - Innovation and Quality 108
  • Summary 127
  • References 128
  • 8 - Risk Taking 130
  • 9 - Communication 138
  • Summary 155
  • References 155
  • 10 - Selection 157
  • 11 - Personal Development and Professional Organizations 165
  • References 173
  • Index 175
  • About the Authors 182
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