Outstanding School Administrators: Their Keys to Success

By Frederick C. Wendel; Fred A. Hoke et al. | Go to book overview

peers bring forth creative ideas in successful administration. He said we need to get out into the field, rub elbows, and hear what's happening. It is very easy to become stagnant in our environment and forget that the same problems are occurring to other principals on a daily basis. Exchanging experiences and certain scenarios are very important at a conference, and much can be learned by listening. He said it is imperative, whether at the local, state, or national level, that building administrators attend meetings where they can mix with fellow administrators. These exchanges always reinforce what educators are doing, or they spur creative thinking for change. Administrators use conferences and workshops to improve their productivity.

A superintendent in North Dakota wrote that he is a real believer in the fact that school administrators must lead by example. He spends many hours on the job beyond what is required. Administrators must model the level of energy, the attitude, and the commitment they expect from their employees. He has always had a positive attitude and a lot of pride in accomplishment--two traits he thinks are essential to a successful school administrator. Continued training and the association with colleagues who are the most successful also have contributed to his administrative success. He likes to determine who is the most successful and then spend time with that person to determine what he would need to do to polish his skills in that area.

An assistant superintendent in Washington State remarked she believes that as a successful administrator, she needs to model the importance of personal and professional growth by taking classes, presenting at workshops and so on. Moving outside of existing paradigms is crucial, and her focus is on continuing education. Personal growth and development allows this paradigm shift to occur.

Successful administrators know the value of continuous professional improvement. They offer no excuses for looking for additional ways to improve their leadership effectiveness. For many, joining, working, and supporting professional associations gives them the exposure to issues and the networking capability to keep them on the leading edge of educational improvements and personal accomplishments.


REFERENCES

Gschwandtner Gerhard. ( 1984). $uperachiever$. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Krug Doug, & Oakley Ed. ( 1993). Enlightened Leadership: Getting to the Heart of Change. New York: Simon & Schuster.

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Outstanding School Administrators: Their Keys to Success
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Educational Philosophy 1
  • Summary 43
  • References 44
  • 2 - Values 45
  • Summary 57
  • References 58
  • 3 - Visionary Leadership 60
  • Summary 68
  • References 69
  • 4 - Institutional Leadership 71
  • Summary 79
  • References 79
  • 5 - Commitment 80
  • Summary 86
  • 6 - Interpersonal Relations 87
  • Summary 107
  • References 107
  • 7 - Innovation and Quality 108
  • Summary 127
  • References 128
  • 8 - Risk Taking 130
  • 9 - Communication 138
  • Summary 155
  • References 155
  • 10 - Selection 157
  • 11 - Personal Development and Professional Organizations 165
  • References 173
  • Index 175
  • About the Authors 182
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.