A Practical Guide to Enrollment and Retention Management in Higher Education

By Marguerite J. Dennis | Go to book overview

8
Advertising

"80 percent of your business comes from 20 percent of your customers."

-- Swim with the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive

I will make the assumption that most people reading this book are totally or partially responsible for their school's advertising program, or are working toward having that responsibility. I will further assume that you have or are questioning whether you are getting the most from your advertising dollars. If so, I recommend the following.
Twenty Advertising Observations and Suggestions
1. Advertising cannot fill empty classrooms or turn an unpopular major into a popular one. Students don't enroll in colleges and universities because of great ads.
2. Advertising can create awareness, help establish an image, or prompt a prospective student to phone for a brochure or application.
3. This may sound like a basic but it is often overlooked: be certain everyone involved in the advertising process has agreed in principle on the purpose and objective of the advertising program.
4. One campus administrator should coordinate and have the overall responsibility for a school's advertising program. Having many people or individ

-51-

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A Practical Guide to Enrollment and Retention Management in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - What is Enrollment Management? 7
  • 2 - Who is an Enrollment Manager? 13
  • 3 - The Future of Enrollment Management 19
  • 4 - The Role of Research in Enrollment Management 27
  • 5 - Marketing 31
  • 6 - Telecounseling: Pick Up the Phone 37
  • 7 - Publications 41
  • 8 - Advertising 51
  • 9 - The Role of Faculty in Enrollment and Retention Management 55
  • 10 - Financial Aid 59
  • 11 - Retention Management 77
  • 12 - Outcomes 99
  • 13 - Evaluation 105
  • 14 - Success and Failure 109
  • 15 - Change: Our Constant Companion 113
  • 16 - Conclusion 117
  • Appendix: Lists and Reports 121
  • Bibliography 129
  • Index 135
  • About the Author *
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