In the Shadow of Liberty: The Chronicle of Ellis Island

By Edward Corsi | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
A CAREER ENDS IN GLORY

THE days following the news of father's election to parliament were the happiest we spent in Lugano. My second sister, Helvetia, had been born only a few days before this new tribute to my father's achievements. He had a new and deeper pride in his family. Once again he felt himself a man of action, able to provide substantially for us. We all believed that the face of fortune had once more turned our way.

Father began work at once upon the address of acceptance he was to deliver in Tuscany, and Giuseppe and I loved the moments when he repeated for us bits of that speech. Of course I cannot now remember any of the words he used, but I do recall the spirit. It was a sermon upon the new Italy, the free Italy, the Italy which would bring Italians back into the glory and international prestige of the vanished days when the Italian nation had stood preëminent throughout the civilized world. It became, at the end, a plea for the republic, for the freedom of the crushed and impoverished masses.

Father left Lugano on Monday morning. He was to speak in Massa on Friday afternoon. A throng of the friends he had made in Lugano came to the boat to say good-by and to wish him increasing success in his work for the republic.

I can only reconstruct the events of that Friday from the accounts of my father's friends who attended the ceremony arranged in his honor. By noon more than fifty thousand people had crowded into

-17-

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