The House of Lords in the Age of Reform, 1784-1837: With an Epilogue on Aristocracy and the Advent of Democracy, 1837-1867

By A. S. Turberville | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
Pitt and the House of Lords

The entry of William Pitt into office at the end of the year 1783 marks an epoch in the domestic history of England. The East India Company Bill of Fox and North had been defeated in the Upper House as a direct result of George III's personal intervention. Immediately upon the rejection of the measure the King dismissed the Coalition Government which he had so devoutly loathed and entrusted a mere stripling in his twenty-fifth year with the formation of a new Administration. For a long time past the Whigs had been wont to declaim against the increasing power of the Crown; now George III seemed to have provided them with the most glaring proof of the validity of their contention. Surely also in taking such 'unconstitutional' action against a Ministry possessed of an overwhelming majority in the House of Commons he had delivered himself into their hands?1 Possibly the King's hand would have been forced had the Coalition demanded an immediate dissolution. But they made the tactical blunder of actually declaring against one. They felt that it was the existing House of Commons that had been outraged, and that the existing House of Commons should have its revenge; no doubt they also felt that they were so strong already that a general election could not make them stronger. When a general election did take place it was because Pitt desired it: already before the end of March 1784 he had won the parliamentary contest, and when the appeal to the country was made he triumphed at the polls also.

But when he had first faced Parliament as a Minister in January such a splendid outcome of his temerity was not to be foreseen. He could indeed count upon the support of the Chamber in which the East India Company Bill had been thrown

____________________
1
See The House of Lords in the XVIIIth Century, pp. 411-15.

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The House of Lords in the Age of Reform, 1784-1837: With an Epilogue on Aristocracy and the Advent of Democracy, 1837-1867
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 519

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.