3
Adventures of the Henley

At about the time Outerbridge was firing the first shots of the war, two privates, Joseph Lockard and George Elliott, were manning the Army's Opana radar station on Kahuku Point, the most northerly point on Oahu. Radar was not sophisticated at the time, and the station was operated only a few hours a day. After General Short received a "war warning" from Washington on November 27, he had ordered that the radar station be operated daily from 4 A.M. to 7 A.M.

When 7 A.M. came, Lockard and Elliott were supposed to shut it down and an Army truck would pick them up for breakfast. The truck was late, so the privates kept the radar on and Lockard was teaching Elliott how the equipment worked. At 7:02 Elliott saw a large blob on the screen and called to Lockard. He recognized it as a fleet of planes and computed them to be approaching from 3 degrees north and 136 miles away, a long distance for the primitive radar to pick up.

Elliott was startled by the size of the blip and guessed it would be caused by at least fifty planes. He and Lockard followed it for a few moments, then Elliott suggested that Lockard call it into the information center.

The station had two telephones, one to the information center and the other to the administrative switchboard. They tried the information center line first but nobody answered, so they tried the administrative telephone operator, who told them he was the only one there. The operator hung up, looked around, and saw that Lieutenant Kermit Tyler, the pursuit duty officer, was still there, so he told the lieutenant about the radar

-43-

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The Day the War Began
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction: Saturday, December 6, 1941 1
  • 1 - The First Shot 21
  • 2 - The Americans Fight Back 27
  • 3 - Adventures of the Henley 43
  • 4 - Game Called Due to War 49
  • 5 - View from the Cane Fields 53
  • 6 - Friendly Fire 61
  • 7 - Chinese-American Family 66
  • 8 - Hell on a Sunshiny Day 70
  • 9 - The Military Takes Over Hawaii 77
  • 10 - Niihau Fights Back 82
  • 11 - The Saga of the Pacific Clipper 86
  • 12 - The Forgotten Attack 93
  • 13 - On the Home Front 97
  • 14 - War Comes to the Football Game 105
  • 15 - The Delayed Message 114
  • 16 - The White House Prepares for War 120
  • 17 - War Becomes a Reality 124
  • 18 - Extra! Extra! 132
  • 19 - Strange New Words 135
  • 20 - Sudden Heroes 142
  • 21 - The Mating Dance Continues 149
  • 22 - The Nation Unifies 154
  • 23 - Hawaii's Longest Night 157
  • 24 - Defending the East Coast 162
  • 25 - I Slept Like a Baby 166
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 181
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