The House of Lords in the Age of Reform, 1784-1837: With an Epilogue on Aristocracy and the Advent of Democracy, 1837-1867

By A. S. Turberville | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
The Peers and Parliamentary
Reform

However jealous the House of Commons might be, at all events in theory, of its sole right to determine the composition of its membership, guarding it by a Standing Order which declared it to be a breach of privilege for a peer to take any part in a parliamentary election, the House of Lords was inevitably interested in questions intimately affecting the character of the other Chamber of the Legislature, and for well over a century the afore-mentioned standing order had been virtually a dead letter. Parliamentary corruption seemed to be a legacy of the Revolution of 1689. It might well be contended that as soon as the House of Commons had made good its independence of the Crown it became dependent upon the aristocracy, and that having secured its independence in action it lost its independence in respect of its composition. Certainly the growth of the power of the Lower House seemed to be acquiesced in by its partner and rival on the tacit understanding that the peers enjoyed a considerable control over the membership of the Chamber which they became less and less able to control in other ways.1

The fact of the influence exerted by the peers in parliamentary elections was notorious in the eighteenth century, and until the birth of the movement for Parliamentary Reform in the seventeen-seventies it was accepted with but little protest. But once public attention was awakened to the desirability of improving the representative system, it was inevitable that a great deal of attention should be concentrated upon the power exerted by the peerage over the membership of the House of

____________________
1
See The House of Lords in the Reign of William III, pp. 172-80; The House of Lords in the XVIIIth Century, pp. 454-78.

-244-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The House of Lords in the Age of Reform, 1784-1837: With an Epilogue on Aristocracy and the Advent of Democracy, 1837-1867
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 519

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.