The House of Lords in the Age of Reform, 1784-1837: With an Epilogue on Aristocracy and the Advent of Democracy, 1837-1867

By A. S. Turberville | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII1
The Peerage in English Society on
the Eve of the Victoria Age

The House of Lords was a vastly more populous place at the accession of Queen Victoria than it had been at the accession of her grandfather in 1760. Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas, in an open-letter to the Duke of Wellington in 1830, computed that three hundred members had been added to the House in the last seventy years, a fact which he accounted 'a danger to the constitution' and 'a burthen on the Public purse'. Sir Nicholas, who was a half-pay naval lieutenant turned bibliophile, and the author of innumerable antiquarian works, including A Synopsis of the Peerage of England ( 1825), may be trusted to have known what he was talking about.2 He wanted to argue the Duke into adopting a scheme for the creation of life-peerages in order to safeguard the hereditary peerage from a decline in quaility. He argued that country gentlemen of ancient family and extensive property formed practically the only class of persons to whose elevation to the ranks of the peerage no objection could be entertained, because their lands were normally entailed upon their eldest sons, who were thus enabled to support their rank. He suggested that no hereditary peerage should be granted unless the recipient was possessed of unencumbered estate proportionate to his new status and undertook strictly to entail it upon his heir. If anyone whom it was desired to honour with a peerage was unwilling to give such an undertaking, the dignity should terminate with his life. Nicolas further urged that the institution of life-

____________________
1
The first three paragraphs of this chapter have been rewritten, and some of the material of the chapter collated from other parts of the author's typescript, by the Editor.
2
His facts, however, should be checked by reference to the figures given in Appendix VI. [Ed.]

-366-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The House of Lords in the Age of Reform, 1784-1837: With an Epilogue on Aristocracy and the Advent of Democracy, 1837-1867
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 519

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.