Political Africa: A Who's Who of Personalities and Parties

By Ronald Segal; Catherine Hoskyns et al. | Go to book overview

Mali, Republic of
AREA: 463,500 sq. milesPOPULATION: 4,300,000 ( U.N. 1959 est.)

SEE: Keita. Madeira; Keita, Modibo; Koné, Jean-Marie.


Union Soudanaise (U.S.)

The Union Soudanaise was founded in 1946 by Mamadou Konaté -- Deputy in the French Assembly and outstanding Soudanese radical who died in 1956 -- as the Soudan section of the inter-territorial Rassemblement Démocratique Africain* (R.D.A.).

The Union Soudanaise was, from its formation, a radical modernist party in opposition to the more conservative and traditional Parti Soudanais Progressiste (P.S.P.) led by Fily Dabo Sissoko. The P.S.P. depended to a large extent on the support of the chiefs, and in the November 1946 elections to the French National Assembly, it won 2 seats to I for the U.S. During 1948 and 1949 the R.D.A., which had close links with the French Communist Party, clashed more and more violently with the French Administration, and all R.D.A. sections including the U.S. were bitterly repressed. In 1950 when the President of the R.D.A., Félix Houphouet-Boigny* of the Ivory Coast, announced that the party was breaking all links with the French Communists, the U.S. leaders concurred but remained in opposition and were still held as suspect by the Administration. Gradually, however, a well-organized, mass party was built up, and in 1956 both Konaté and Modibo Keita* -- now head of the Mali government and then Secretary-General of the party -- were elected to the French National Assembly. In 1957 after the application of the new 'loi cadre' constitution, the U.S. won 64 out of the 70 seats in the Territorial Assembly and formed the government. In the same year it emerged, with the Parti Démocratique de Guinée * of Sékou Touré* , as the leader of the radical wing within the R.D.A., challenging the policy of Houphouet-Boigny, who favoured separate territorial links with France rather than a united link between France and a federated French West Africa.

In September 1958 the U.S. campaigned reluctantly for a vote of oui -- and a further measure of autonomy within a French Community -- in the referendum offered by General de Gaulle. The party leadership was unwilling to disunite French West Africa over the vote. In addition, the party felt it was not yet powerful enough and feared that it would be crushed if it called for a vote of non- complete independence from France -- and lost. In November 1958 the Soudan

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Political Africa: A Who's Who of Personalities and Parties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Books That Matter iv
  • Preface v
  • Ronald Michael Segal ix
  • Political Africa - Personalities xi
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 51
  • D 64
  • E 82
  • F 90
  • G 95
  • H 104
  • I 112
  • J 115
  • K 119
  • 1 152
  • M 165
  • N 200
  • O 217
  • P 228
  • R 230
  • S 236
  • T 258
  • V 271
  • W 277
  • Y 284
  • Z 287
  • Political Africa - Parties 289
  • Inter-Territorial Movements 291
  • Algeria 298
  • Angola 302
  • Basutoland 304
  • Bechuanaland 307
  • Cameroons (british) 309
  • Cameroun, Republic Of 312
  • Central African Republic 316
  • Republic of Congo 317
  • Congo Republic, The 319
  • Dahomey, Republic Of 327
  • Ethiopia 330
  • Gabon 331
  • Gambia 333
  • Ghana, Republic Of 335
  • Guinea, Republic Of 340
  • Ivory Coast 343
  • Kenya 346
  • Liberia 353
  • Libya 354
  • Malagasy Republic 357
  • Mali, Republic Of 361
  • Mauritania, Islamic Republic Of 364
  • Moçambique 366
  • Morocco 367
  • Niger, Republic Of 370
  • Nigeria, Federation Of 372
  • Rhodesia and Nyasaland, Federation Of 382
  • Portuguese Guinea 399
  • Ruanda -- Urundi 400
  • Senegal 405
  • Sierra Leone 408
  • French Somaliland 411
  • Somali Republic 412
  • South Africa, Union Of 415
  • South West Africa 439
  • Sudan 443
  • Swaziland 450
  • Tanganyika 451
  • Tchad 454
  • Togo, Republic Of 456
  • Tunisia 459
  • Uganda Protectorate 462
  • United Arab Republic 465
  • Upper Volta 471
  • Zanzibar 473
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