Political Africa: A Who's Who of Personalities and Parties

By Ronald Segal; Catherine Hoskyns et al. | Go to book overview

Tchad
AREA: 495,000 sq. milesPOPULATION: 2,730,000 (latest est.)

SEE: Kerallah, Ali Djibrine; Lisette, Gabriel; Tombalbaye, François.


Parti Progressiste Tchadien (P.P.T.)

Founded in June 1947 by Gabriel Lisette*, a West Indian who had been in the French Administration and had been elected as Deputy for Tchad to the French National Assembly, the P.P.T. was centred in the south of the country and became the local section of the inter-territorial Rassemblement Démocratique Africain*, led by Houphouet-Boigny* of the Ivory Coast. Lisette dominated the party and, after the territorial elections in 1957, became head of the first African government. The Muslims in the North, however, grew increasingly suspicious of his régime, and in May 1959 he handed over the leadership of the party and of the government to one of his Tchadien supporters, François Tombalbaye*. In February 1960 the local Muslim parties fused to form the Parti National Africain* (P.N.A.) which, since the Muslims compose 55 per cent of the population, constituted a considerable threat to the P.P.T. In August Tombalbaye divested Lisette of his posts in the government, in an attempt to unite the country; but as a result he faced a revolt within his own party, and five of the P.P.T. Deputies decided to sit as Independents. In December 1960, out of an Assembly of eighty- three, the P.P.T. held sixty-seven seats, the P.N.A. ten seats, and Independents six. The P.P.T. has strongly backed federation for the four territories of French Equatorial Africa -- Gabon, Central Africa, Tchad and Congo -- particularly since Tchad itself is land-locked; but in August 1960 the Union des Républiques d'Afrique Central was abandoned, mainly because Gabon, the richest territory of the four, was unwilling to join. The leaders of the P.P.T. are among the strongest supporters of the French Community, which in its new form links France with some of the newly independent French colonies. In March 1961 Tombalbaye announced the fusion of the P.P.T. with the P.N.A. to form the new Union pour le Progrès du Tchad (U.P.T.), which now has 77 of the 83 seats in the National Assembly.


Parti National Africain (P.N.A.)

The Parti National Africain was formed in February 1960 in all attempt to unite the small, local parties of the Muslim North in opposition to the Southern

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Political Africa: A Who's Who of Personalities and Parties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Books That Matter iv
  • Preface v
  • Ronald Michael Segal ix
  • Political Africa - Personalities xi
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 51
  • D 64
  • E 82
  • F 90
  • G 95
  • H 104
  • I 112
  • J 115
  • K 119
  • 1 152
  • M 165
  • N 200
  • O 217
  • P 228
  • R 230
  • S 236
  • T 258
  • V 271
  • W 277
  • Y 284
  • Z 287
  • Political Africa - Parties 289
  • Inter-Territorial Movements 291
  • Algeria 298
  • Angola 302
  • Basutoland 304
  • Bechuanaland 307
  • Cameroons (british) 309
  • Cameroun, Republic Of 312
  • Central African Republic 316
  • Republic of Congo 317
  • Congo Republic, The 319
  • Dahomey, Republic Of 327
  • Ethiopia 330
  • Gabon 331
  • Gambia 333
  • Ghana, Republic Of 335
  • Guinea, Republic Of 340
  • Ivory Coast 343
  • Kenya 346
  • Liberia 353
  • Libya 354
  • Malagasy Republic 357
  • Mali, Republic Of 361
  • Mauritania, Islamic Republic Of 364
  • Moçambique 366
  • Morocco 367
  • Niger, Republic Of 370
  • Nigeria, Federation Of 372
  • Rhodesia and Nyasaland, Federation Of 382
  • Portuguese Guinea 399
  • Ruanda -- Urundi 400
  • Senegal 405
  • Sierra Leone 408
  • French Somaliland 411
  • Somali Republic 412
  • South Africa, Union Of 415
  • South West Africa 439
  • Sudan 443
  • Swaziland 450
  • Tanganyika 451
  • Tchad 454
  • Togo, Republic Of 456
  • Tunisia 459
  • Uganda Protectorate 462
  • United Arab Republic 465
  • Upper Volta 471
  • Zanzibar 473
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