Air and Water Pollution Regulation: Accomplishments and Economic Consequences

By Martin Freedman; Bikki Jaggi | Go to book overview

vation. By encouraging the consumer to purchase energy-efficient products through the use of various incentives (e.g., rebates) electricity demand decreases, resulting in the generation of less electricity and also in less air pollution. As long as the state utility commissions reward the electric utility for reduced generation, it will be in everybody's interest to pursue energy conservation.

Economic growth and pollution abatement are concepts that are not necessarily diametrically opposed. In the over 20 years since the passage of the Clean Air Act, the economy has grown fairly dramatically and the increase in most air pollution emissions has been halted and reversed. However, air pollution is still a major problem facing the United States and the world, and massive reductions are needed in a number of pollutants, especially those that cause acid rain and deplete the ozone layer. Whether, in the process of trying to eliminate those pollutants, economic growth will be retarded remains to be seen. It is hoped that using new approaches to pollution abatement will result in effective and efficient solutions that will still allow all people to increase their standard of living and improve the quality of their lives.


NOTES
1.
Council on Environmental Quality, Environmental Quality 1970-1990 ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1978), p. 3.
2.
Ibid., p. 4.
3.
Gladwin Hill, "Activity Ranges from Oratory to Legislation," New York Times, April 23, 1970, p. 30.
4.
Editorial, "The Good Earth," New York Times, April 23, 1970, p. 36.
5.
Thomas Tietenberg, Environmental and Natural Resource Economics ( Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman), p. 339.
6.
Ibid., p. 334.
7.
Council on Environmental Quality, Environmental Quality -- 1975 ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975), p. 299.
8.
Tietenberg, Natural Resource Economics, p. 334.
9.
Council on Environmental Quality, Environmental Quality -- 1977 ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1977), p. 22.
10.
Council on Environmental Quality, 1975, p. 304.
11.
Council on Environmental Quality, 1977, p. 24.
12.
Ibid., p. 24.
13.
Philip Shabecoff, "Bush Is Talking, Congress Is Shifting: An Emergence of Political Will on Acid Rain," New York Times, February 19, 1989, p. 5.
14.
Ibid.
15.
Kentucky, State Division of Air Quality, "Major Requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990" (mimeographed, March 18, 1991), p. 1.
16.
Matthew Wald, "9 States in East Plan to Restrict Pollution by Cars," New York Times, October 10, 1991, p. 1.
17.
Kentucky, "Major Requirements," p. 4.

-19-

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