Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III

THEY landed at Natchez and he forgot his pain for a time. There upon the wharf, amid a crowd of wagons and freight, rapturous with delight and welcome, was Taylor Tibbs, Jr., with the coach. (The elder Tibbs had dropped dead of apoplexy one day in the dining room.) Soon they were at a gallop down the familiar road, making the sand fly behind them; snow and raw winds were gone, the balm of a Southern springtime wrapped them, and a riot of blossoms strewed the way. As they sped on, faster and faster, every other thought was driven from Allan's mind by the thought of Valley Hall. The two gazed about them, become suddenly as eager and voluble as schoolboys.

They had ridden about two hours -- the landscape was growing homelike -- when there came from afar the sound of galloping hoof beats, and ahead of them, far down the road, they saw two riders approaching in a cloud of dust. They were racing, bending over their horses' necks, and lashing them like mad. The coach passed down into a hollow, and then as it labored up the opposite slope, the riders burst suddenly over the brow of the hill. They came with the sweep of a tornado and a thunder of hoofs, the horses with nostrils distended and manes flying wildly. In another instant they would have been past, but one of them glanced up, and spying the coach, drew rein, with such force as to cause his horse to rear and slide along in a whirl of dust. An instant more, as it seemed, the coach having stopped also, the rider was leaning over and stretching out his hand, shouting, "By the great Jehoshaphat, but here they are!"

Allan stared. He saw before him a huge man about

-100-

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Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
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