Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI

THEY talked politics, more eagerly than ever, upon the boat. In Congress, and all over the country, men were still discussing the Sumner outrage--the North in furious indignation, the South in exulting triumph. The senator was not dead, it transpired--only crippled for life. Mr. Toombs and Mr. Davis had expressed their approval of the assault--and public meetings in the South were presenting Brooks with canes bearing devices such as, "Use knockdown arguments!" and "Hit him again!"

In "bleeding Kansas" the sacking of the town of Lawrence had been the signal for the outbreak of civil war. One John Brown, an antislavery leader, had made a midnight raid with a band of followers upon a settlement on "Pottawatomie Creek," and taking five proslavery settlers from their beds, had "executed" them, as he termed it, by hacking them to pieces with an old army cutlass. The Missourians were now on the war-path, seeking vengeance for this deed, and guerilla bands were roaming over the territory. When Allan's steamer reached Cairo, the news came that the proslavery men had declared a blockade of the Missouri River, and that persons bound for Kansas who were deemed suspicious were sent floating down again tied to logs.

Allan turned his back upon these things--he was going home to Boston. He asked himself what after that, but he did not know--he only wanted to be alone. He reached Cincinnati early the following morning, and would have taken a train for the East, stopping only for breakfast, had not something occurred to delay him.

As the steamer was approaching the city, he noticed up the river another boat, belonging apparently to the same line, coming from the opposite direction, under the

-174-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.