Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I

IN the last days of March Allan set out once more for Valley Hall.

Allan's home was still the South. It had been four years since he had left it forever, but it had never ceased to be his home; and now as the ship moved, and the chill mists of Boston vanished, and the breezes began to grow warm, the longing of it came over him. The old plantation -- he was to see it once again! How plainly it all stood out in his memory! And the people -- how were they? For four years he had not had a word -- some of them might be dead, for all he knew. They had been incensed when he left; but surely time had mellowed their feelings -- it had mellowed his, and he yearned to see them again He yearned to see the cotton fields, flooded with sunshine. To see the moonlight on the corn! To hear the mockingbird, to watch the fireflies, and drink in the odor of jasmine and sweetbrier at twilight! Gladly would Allan have escaped from all the stern realities of the hour.

-- But there was no escaping them on the steamer. It was bound for New Orleans, and the few passengers were all Southerners, and were on edge with excitement; to be at sea for a week at such a time was a sore trial. The vessel was never far from the coast, and when it was opposite Charleston they listened for the sound of guns. Rounding Florida they passed close to a schooner, and the steamer slowed up while they hailed her. But she had no news, and so when they neared the end of the journey the suspense had come to be all but unbearable.

How well Allan remembered that low coast, and all the sights of it! Those long white reefs lined with trees, over which flapped the armies of pelicans--it might have been one instead of eleven years ago that he had seen them. But when they neared their destination and the customs

-277-

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Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
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