Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II

ALLAN went back to New Orleans that night, pacing the deck of the steamer and chewing the cud of bitter reflection. What a blow in the face his visit had gotten him!

Allan knew little of the value of money -- having always had more than he needed -- and it was not so much the loss of his property. Nor was it his disappointment at the failure of his plans; the misery of the negroes of Valley Hall seemed a trivial matter in comparison with the significance of what he had experienced -- the light which it threw upon the temper of the people. It had exceeded anything that he had dreamed; and as for the North -- what would its awakening be!

The news which he had heard at Woodville proved to be no mere rumor. It developed that the Washington government had sent word to Charleston that it intended to provision the fort --"peaceably," as it said, that is by an unarmed vessel. In New Orleans there was wild excitement, a regiment having just been ordered to assemble and hold itself in readiness. Allan had intended to return North by steamer, but this news changed his plans, and decided him to travel by land, and pass through Charleston.

He left New Orleans the same morning, by the steamer for Mobile. The trip was the same one he had taken with his father eleven years before; it took a day and a night -- first through Lake Pontchartrain, and then along the coast of the Gulf, or rather the narrow passage inside the reefs, beyond which one could see the surf, snow-white, through endless pine trees. On the other side the land was so cut up with bayous that no one saw little sail-boats apparently skimming through green meadows.

At dawn they came into Mobile Bay, where, at the

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Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
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