Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V

"You know," said Lovejoy, when the two had gone apart after this incident and sat down to stare at each other--"you know there's something great about a man who can come out of the backwoods into the White House and do as that man does. It may be it's nothing but blindness, but it's blindness that's epic in its proportion--it's blindness that amounts to genius! Is it really that he is so obtuse that he doesn't know the effect he produces? Or doesn't he care, or is it a pose, or what? I declare I can't fathom him--he's too much for me."

"The crowd seemed to like it," said Allan; "but does he do like that all the time?"

"That!" cried the other. "That isn't a circumstance. I suppose so far as stories go, and smutty stories in particular, the senators and congressmen when they get together socially tell them about as much as any other men. But this man tells them all the time--he doesn't care who it is, a diplomat or a duke or a bishop; and he doesn't care where it is, at some formality, some reception. And he sends them away, you know with their heads reeling --and he doesn't seem to have the slightest idea of it all! They say, though, that sometimes he uses them to get rid of the office seekers--that he positively scares them out of the place!"

After midnight the poker-playing and story-telling ceased, and the "Frontier Guards" wrapped themselves in slumber on the floor of their palatial quarters. Toward morning Allan received an answer to his dispatch, informing him that the Fifth had not yet been called; this decided him to continue on to Boston, as he had originally intended. He wished to bid farewell to his home before the fighting came on, and the news in the papers was that the Massa

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Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
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