Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI

ALLAN was sure that the regiment had not passed him anywhere, but still he was anxious, and sprang into a cab and drove in haste to the Armory, on Lafayette Place. As soon as he came near he saw that he was in time. The crowd about it was so dense that the cab was stopped a hundred yards away, and he was forced to leave it and push through on foot.

There was a mob besieging the Armory gates, friends and relatives of the militiamen, begging to be admitted, and Allan had difficulty in getting by. He learned, however, that the "Cambridge Tigers" had arrived, and when he declared that his errand was to enlist, the doorkeepers consented to let him pass.

The main hall of the Armory was a scene of confusion indescribable; there was packing of knapsacks, rolling of blankets, loading of guns; men flying in every direction, muskets stacked here and there; piles of baggage, banners, drums, musical instruments, camp-kettles, upon the floor; and above all a babel of voices, shouts and laughter, and cries of command. Allan saw the flag of the Massachusetts company in one corner, and made his way toward it. There was Jack, flushed with excitement, talking eagerly; and suddenly catching sight of his cousin he made a dash for him, crying out with delight, "Well, old man!"

And then, all at once, he noticed Allan's condition, and stared. "What in the world has been happening to you? he cried.

"I have been through Baltimore," Allan answered.

And Jack gave a yell. "He's been through Baltimore!" A crowd surrounded them in an instant -- the cry went through the place, "A man from Baltimore!" and every instant the press about them grew greater.

-339-

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Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
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