Manassas: A Novel of the War

By Upton Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I

IN Jersey City there were twenty thousand people to greet them; the depot was packed solid, and a platoon of police had to clear the way with clubs. And when at last they had started, they found a throng all along the track, continuing even after they left the town. There was nowhere a car's length without a person, -- and this was true all the way to Philadelphia. There were thousands of people at every stop, and enough refreshments offered them for a supper once an hour. The cheering seemed never to cease -- even after midnight they could not have slept had they wanted to. At a station they passed at two o'clock in the morning they found a group of old ladies waiting for them with pails of ice-water; and when they came into Philadelphia toward morning, there was a crowd there, and a banquet, disguised as a breakfast, prepared for them at all the hotels.

Here it transpired that their desire to march through Baltimore was not to be gratified. Bridges were down and the telegraph wires cut, and, moreover, the spineless administration had given way before the frantic demands of the authorities of the city, and had promised that no more troops should come through it! At that hour Baltimore was in the hands of a mob, which had sacked the gun shops and the liquor stores; the streets were barricaded and guarded by artillery and cavalry, and companies of secessionists were hurrying in from the neighborhood. The wildest rumors as to the fate of Washington prevailed.

Here the Massachusetts company joined the regiment to which it was ordered, and came under the command of its officer, one Benjamin Butler destined to fame. General Butler had been a criminal lawyer not of the highest reputability, and a pro-slavery Democratic politician whose boast it was that he had voted fifty-seven times for

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Manassas: A Novel of the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Notes xxvi
  • Book I - The Morning 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 62
  • Book II - The Crisis 79
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 93
  • Chapter III 100
  • Chapter IV 106
  • Chapter V 116
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 141
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 163
  • Chapter X 168
  • Chapter XI 174
  • Chapter XII 180
  • Chapter XIII 188
  • Book III - The Climax 195
  • Chapter I 197
  • Chapter II 210
  • Chapter III 218
  • Chapter IV 230
  • Chapter V 234
  • Chapter VI 240
  • Chapter VII 252
  • Chapter VIII 261
  • Book IV - The Storm 275
  • Chapter I 277
  • Chapter II 292
  • Chapter III 304
  • Chapter IV 320
  • Chapter V 329
  • Chapter VI 339
  • Book V - The Battle 349
  • Chapter I 351
  • Chapter II 359
  • Chapter III 370
  • Chapter IV 384
  • Chapter V 400
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