The Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition - Vol. 6

By Meriwether Lewis; William Clark et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Numerous persons have helped us in bringing this volume to completion. Their subject knowledge or love of the Lewis and Clark expedition and their selfless sharing of time and talents have increased the worth of the annotations to the text tremendously. The great captains and their party may have been able to accomplish their explorations without the help of native guides, but the going would have been far more difficult, time consuming, and hazardous. We too, may have completed our work without the assistance of specialists and dedicated laypersons, but the quality of the work would have suffered and our journeys into unknown areas would have been more burdensome without them. Our guides were friendly, wise, and generous.

Three special friends of this project have died since the publication of the last volume: Donald Jackson, Paul Russell Cutright, and Robert B. Betts. These men aided this endeavor with their writings, their advice, and their good will; they will be sorely missed. Their good names and good works will live on.

A number of people have continued helping the project. Robert E. Lange of Portland, Oregon, assisted in tracking down Columbia River nomenclature and provided numerous other services. James P. Ronda and W. Raymond Wood were always at hand with comments, encouragement, and friendly advice. Robert B. Betts ( New York City), Gladys Watkins Allen ( Alton, Illinois), William P. Sherman ( Portland, Oregon), and Lyle S. Woodcock ( St. Louis, Missouri) contributed financially to the project. Likewise, the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation provided financial aid, and its many members have been steadfast friends and supporters.

At the principal repositories of Lewis and Clark materials we again had the professional and capable assistance of Beth Carroll-Horrocks, Martin L. Levitt, Roy, E. Goodman, Edward. C. Carter II, and Randolph S. Klein, all of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, and Duane R. Sneddeker and Bryan Stephen Thomas of the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis. Staff, office, and administrative help came from the Center or Great Plains Studies and the project itself at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. We can thank Frederick C.

-ix-

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