The Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition - Vol. 11

By Joseph Whitehouse; Gary E. Moulton | Go to book overview

Editorial Procedures

For volumes 9, 10, and 11, the final journal-volumes in this edition of the journals of the Lewis and Clark expedition, the principal editorial goal remains that stated in volume 2, that is, to present users with a reliable text largely uncluttered with editorial interference. Readers can find a fuller statement of editing principles in the Editorial Procedures in volume 2. The following paragraphs explain the purpose and extent of editorial annotation included in the present volumes, since the approach to annotation here differs from the method followed with the journals of Lewis and Clark.

Believing that the annotation to Lewis's and Clark's journals in the previous volumes furnished the essential information needed to understand the events, persons, and inquiries of the expedition, we deemed it unnecessary to reproduce those notes in their entirety in these enlisted men's volumes. We assume that most users turn to Lewis's and Clark's journals as their primary source of information on the expedition and use the enlisted men's journals as supplements. Where the enlisted men provide new or substantially different material in their journals, however, we have commented on that fact and explained the matter as extensively as we did in the captains' journals.

The annotation for the present three volumes falls under four large categories: people, places, animals, and plants. These have been the fields of greatest interest to users of the journals and were the areas most often noticed by the enlisted men. These were also the points on which these men were most likely to provide information not found in the captains' journals. Our aim was to establish a method that was not unnecessarily redundant to previous volumes but that provided readers with essential information so they did not need to refer constantly to other books.

In these volumes the notes have been abbreviated considerably. For example, authoritative sources are not listed in most notes since that information was provided in previous volumes. We do not provide geographic locations for every point mentioned in the enlisted men's journals, nor do we necessarily locate each day's campsite: these locales were discussed in detailed notes to the captains' journals. In the present volumes we try to give a sense of place from day to day by locating the

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The Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition - Vol. 11
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Editorial Procedures ix
  • Introduction to Volume 11 xi
  • Chapter Fifty-Five - Up the Missouri 1
  • Chapter Fifty-Six - Winter at the Knife River 85
  • Chapter Fifty-Seven - Great Falls of the Missouri 132
  • Chapter Fifty-Eight - Across the Rockies 227
  • Chapter Fifty-Nine - Winter on the Coast 348
  • Sources Cited 441
  • Index 443
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