The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997

By Wes Williams | Go to book overview

1
Introduction: Nature, Values, and the Future of Science

Jonathan Rée

As I walked into Christopher Wren's magnificent Sheldonian Theatre to listen to the first of the 1997 Oxford Amnesty Lectures on "The Values of Science," I found myself thinking about my first chemistry lesson at school. The topic was combustion, but our teacher began with a short lecture on the nature of science. Science is based purely on observation, he said, and it goes back to the seventeenth century (just like the Sheldonian) to the "scientific revolution," in which Europe shook off the superstitions of the Dark Ages and woke up to the objective reality of the world of nature as revealed to the senses.

At the end of the lesson, our teacher told us all to write a paragraph describing what happens when a piece of paper burns, and I obediently recorded a whole range of objective facts garnered from observation: the way you strike a match and apply it, for best effect, to a torn edge of the paper; the flames that lick and flicker and vary in color from rim to centre and from tip to root; the acrid smell of the smoke; and the ragged shapes of the charred scraps left behind.

The teacher was dismayed that I had so misunderstood his point about science and observation: the facts we were meant to establish were those set out in the first chapter of our textbook, not those we knew from our own experience. I took his point and became a good enough chemistry student. But a seed of doubt had been sown in my mind: do scientists really understand the nature of their craft?

The lecture in the Sheldonian that evening was by Richard Dawkins, and he struck a note of panic that came as rather a surprise to me and, I think, to most of the rest of the audience. Instead of considering possible conflicts between modern science and human rights, he painted a portrait of contemporary scientists as a beleaguered minority, victimised by

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to the Oxford Amnesty Lectures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction: Nature, Values, And the Future of Science 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Values of Science And The Science of Values 11
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Science with Scruples 42
  • Notes 55
  • 4 - What Shall We Tell The Children? 58
  • Notes 78
  • 5 - Is the World Simple Or Complex? 80
  • 6 - Faith in the Truth 95
  • Notes 108
  • 7 - The Myths We Live By 110
  • Notes 131
  • About the Editor And Contributors 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 142

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.