Divorced, Beheaded, Survived: A Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII

By Karen Lindsey | Go to book overview

More Praise for Karen Lindsey's
Divorced, Beheaded, Survived

"For one unaccustomed to the cast of characters at Henry's court, here is a fine crash course. Lindsey starts us off with Henry's grandmother, the cunning Margaret Beaufort, and leaves us with Henry's second daughter, Elizabeth, who would grow up to rule England for 50 memorable years."

-- Fort Worth Star-Telegram

"A lively and enthralling read about a fascinating subject. The story of the wives of Henry VIII has been milked for titillation and melodrama, but rarely has it been addressed so clearly, with so much womanly common sense and wit. Lindsey makes us take a fresh look at a story we may think we know. The result is delightful."

-- Marge Piercy

" Karen Lindsey brings a fresh and thoughtful perspective to the story of the wives of Henry VIII. These fascinating women are brought to new life by her lively descriptions and feminist insights. Anyone interested in biography, women's history, or Tudor court politics should enjoy this book."

-- Carole Levin Professor of History, SUNY--New Paltz

Author, "The Heart and Stomach of a King": Elizabeth I and the Politics of Sex and Power

"Delightful. . . . Informed by feminist theory and experience, this is a lively and convincing reconstruction of the lives and characters of the six queens and their setting in Tudor England. Karen Lindsey offers an original and important perspective on 16th-century history and women's lives."

-- Clarissa Atkinson Associate Dean, Harvard University Divinity School

Author, The Oldest Vocation: Christian Motherhood in the Medieval West

"A scholarly yet lively book that reads like a novel. A feminist reinterpretation--it's about time!"

-- Robin Morgan

-i-

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Divorced, Beheaded, Survived: A Feminist Reinterpretation of the Wives of Henry VIII
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • More Praise for Karen Lindsey's - Divorced, Beheaded, Survived i
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Who Was Who in The World of Henry VIII xv
  • Introduction xix
  • Prologue - The Kingmaker 2
  • Chapter 1 - The Daughter of Spain 12
  • Chapter 2 - Married Life 26
  • Chapter 3 - The Great Whore 46
  • Chapter 4 - The Court of Two Queens 70
  • Chapter 5 - Anna Sans Tete 92
  • Chapter 6 - The Vessel 116
  • Chapter 7 - The Flanders Mare 136
  • Chapter 8 - The Rose with a Thorn 158
  • Chapter 9 - The Clerk 180
  • Epilogue - Both King and Queen 204
  • Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
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