The Witch Must Die: The Hidden Meaning of Fairy Tales

By Sheldon Cashdan | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 2
Finding Fairy Tales
The number of books on fairy tales is vast. In addition to the standard collections and scholarly treatises, there are tales from almost every imaginable part of the world. To avoid making the bibliography bloated and unwieldy, I have included only those books I personally have found useful and fun to read. The entries include brief annotations to help readers decide which books might of particular interest.
FAIRY-TALE COLLECTIONS
Beauties, Beasts, and Enchantment: Classic French Fairy Tales, translated by Jack Zipes ( New York: NAL Books, 1989), features a highly stylized version of "The Adroit Princess" and a number of other "salon" fairy tales.
The Blue Fairy Book, collected by Andrew Lang ( London: Longmans, Green Co., 1889; reprint, New York. Dover, 1965) is the volume in the Lang "color" fairy-tale series that contains the stories with which most people are familiar. Less familiar tales can be found in the Yellow, Red, and Gray volumes.
The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales, translated by Margaret Hunt ( New York: Pantheon Books, 1944), contains all 220 of the Grimm tales, including "The Juniper Tree."
Don't Bet on the Prince: Contemporary Feminist Fairy Tales in North America and England, edited by Jack Zipes ( New York: Methuen,

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Witch Must Die: The Hidden Meaning of Fairy Tales
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Dedication Page v
  • Other Works by Sheldon Cashdan vi
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Once Upon a Time 1
  • 2 - The Witch Within The Sleeping Beauties 21
  • 4 - Where Bread Crumbs Lead 63
  • 5 - Envy If the Slipper Fits . . 85
  • 6 - Objects That Love 107
  • 7 - Deceit Spinning Tales, Weaving Lies 129
  • 8 - Lust A Tail of the Sea 151
  • 9 - Greed The Beanstalk's Bounty 173
  • 10 - Sloth Geppetto's Dream 195
  • 11 - Inside Oz 217
  • 12 - Once Upon a Future 239
  • Appendix 1 - Using Fairy Tales 259
  • Appendix 2 - Finding Fairy Tales 273
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.