The Experimental Psychology of Beauty

By C. W. Valentine | Go to book overview

INDEX OF SUBJECTS
Aesthetic attitude, 5
Aesthetic value of attitudes to colours, 57
Alliteration, 401, 406
Architecture, 165
Art not identified with beauty, 6
Artist's skill, thoughts of in appreciation, 125
Associations, experiment on influence of, 31
fused and unfused, 56
fused and unfused in reading poetry, 364
fused and unfused with musical intervals, 201, 202
in listening to music, 229
with colours, 29, 30
Attention, combined stimulation and facilitation of, in enjoyment of beauty, 420
Attention, facilitation of, 80
Attitudes to colours, 53ff.
to musical compositions, 206, 291
to musical intervals, aesthetic value of, 202
towards an object, common to the three arts, 413, 414
towards single tones, 205
Auditory imagery and music, 257
and music of great composers, 257, 258
in reading poetry, 343
in silent reading of poetry, 344
Averages (of colour preferences, etc.) may conceal individual differences, 36, 42
Balance, experiments on, 100
and suggested movement, 102
Beauty, distinguished from pleasingness, 135
found in some modern poetry, 397, 404
and functional purpose, 165
of nature and infancy, 111
in modern art, 183ff.
in music, 315
meanings of, 3, 4
not important in modern poetry, 382ff.
and pleasingness in responses to poetry, 322
Children, artists versus, in judging pictures, 147ff.
colour preferences of, 35ff.
early development in a few, of musical discrimination, 305
effect of early musical training on, 219
first attitudes to pictures, 119ff.
imagery of, in reading poetry, 373, 374
preferences for colour combinations, 64
preferences with objets d'art, 164
reactions to modern art, 161
reasons for liking poems, 328ff.
reports on beautiful things, 112, 113
sensitivity to compositional unity, 116
sex differences in preferences for poems, 326ff.
Colour, combinations of, 62ff.
children's and students' preferences, 64
relation of pleasantness of, to that of colours seen singly, 63
domination versus form in reactions to modern art, 188
effect of area of, 50
background on, 49
prolonged looking at, 51
and form dominance, 90

-434-

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