Explorers, Traders, and Slavers: Forging the Old Spanish Trail, 1678-1850

By Joseph P. Sánchez | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
Cartographical Pathways to the Old Spanish Trail The Road to Mythical Teguayo

LIKE ALMOST EVERY colonial road in North America, the Old Spanish Trail, with all of its variations, was forged from Indian pathways similar to those that crisscrossed the entire Western Hemisphere. From that standpoint, the origins of the Old Spanish Trail are obscure, although it first came into the historical limelight when Yuta guides led Spanish colonial frontiersmen in New Mexico northwestward from Santa Fe beyond Abiquiú through the Utah canyonlands to the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake. Only then, at its historical debut, did the Yuta country become part of the Spanish claim to New Mexico.

The Spanish claim to New Mexico developed quickly in the sixteenth century. Significantly, not quite forty-eight years had passed since Christopher Columbus's first voyage, when, in 1540, Spanish explorers under Francisco Vázquez de Coronado camped on the west side of present Albuquerque,1 on their way to traversing much of the interior of the continent and reaching the Great Plains of central Kansas. They had, indeed, taken a major step north from Mexico. Spain's fascination with North America grew throughout the colonial period. Maps drawn between 1500 when Juan de la Cosa, having sailed with Columbus, printed his chart featuring the Caribbean Islands (Map 1) and 1819 when Facundo Melgares, governor of New Mexico, sent a map to the viceroy in Mexico City showing Santa Fe in relation to the southern Rockies as far north as South Pass (Map 2) sharpened the European view of North

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Explorers, Traders, and Slavers: Forging the Old Spanish Trail, 1678-1850
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.