Troja: Results of the Latest Researches and Discoveries on the Site of Homer's Troy, 1882

By Heinrich Schliemann | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.
THE THIRD, FOURTH, FIFTH, AND SIXTH SETTLEMENTS
ON THE SITE OF TROY.

§ I.--THE THIRD PREHISTORIC SETTLEMENT.

AFTER the great catastrophe of the second city, the Acropolis formed an immense heap of ruins, from which there stood forth only the great brick wall and the thick walls of the temples. It is impossible to say, even approximately, how long the Acropolis lay deserted; but, judging from the very insignificant stratum of black earth, which we find between the débris of the second settlement and the house floors of the third, we presume, with great probability, that the place was soon rebuilt. The number of the third settlers was but small, and they consequently settled on the old Pergamos. They did not rebuild the lower city, and probably used its site as fields and pasture-ground for their herds. Such of the building materials of the lower city, as could be used, were no doubt employed by the new settlers for the construction of their houses. On the old Acropolis the ruins and débris were left lying just as the new-comers found them; they did not go to the trouble of making a level platform. Some of them erected their houses on the hillock formed by the ruins and débris of the temples, whilst others built on the space before these edifices, on which there lay only a very insignificant stratum of débris. The house-walls of this third settlement consist, in general, of small unwrought stones joined with clay, but brick walls also occur now and then. They are covered on both sides with a clay coating, which has been pargetted with a thin layer of clay to give it a smoother appearance. The

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