Cultures in Conflict: A Documentary History of the Mormon War in Illinois

By John E. Hallwas; Roger D. Launius | Go to book overview

gone so far as to preclude the possibility of retreat -- sure it is, they cannot retreat honorably....

We stated last week that William Law was the Prophet of the New Church at Nauvoo. This was denied, we hear, by Mr. Law, who says no man can assume the Spirit of Prophecy. He is President of the New Church, but will not venture to publish any revelations.

The New Church appears to be going ahead. On last Sunday, there were about three hundred assembled at Mr. Law's house in Nauvoo, and listened with much seeming pleasure to a sermon from Elder Blakely [ James A. Blakeslee ], who denounced Smith as a fallen Prophet. He treated the Spiritual wife doctrine without gloves, and repudiated Smith's plan of uniting Church and State.

After Blakely had concluded, William Law gave his reasons in strong language for leaving the false prophet.

Francis M. Higbee, then read a series of resolutions which set forth the reasons for withdrawing from Joe. After this a number of Affidavits were read testifying to Joe's villainy, and showing the evils under which a huge portion of the citizens are obliged to labor.

The new church and those opposed to Mormonism in Nauvoo, are said to be strongly in favor of repeating their Charter, it having been made an instrument of oppression rather than a benefit.

The Nauvoo Expositor is the title of a new paper about to be started at Nauvoo, by the opponents of Joe. The Prospectus has been issued, in which the proposed character of the paper is set forth. It will have nothing to do with religion, but goes in for the repeal of the Nauvoo City Charter, against political revelations and unconstitutional ordinances. As the conductors of this paper are well acquainted with Joe, it will in all probability make some disclosures which will render Nauvoo too hot either for Joe or his enemies. We will endeavor to keep our readers well apprised of everything of interest to them. In the mean time we say, success to the new undertaking, for "a kingdom divided against itself cannot stand."


6
An Exposé Poem on Smith's Polygamy

I n 1844 two lyrics appeared in the Warsaw newspaper under the pseudonym Buckey. Both criticized Smith's polygamy. They were obviously written by a very well-informed person who had become disenchanted with him. Mormon historians have traditionally assigned the authorship to Wilson Law, the brother of dissident leader William Law. The Laws had come to Nauvoo late in 1839. Wilson became a

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