Six Plays for Young People from the Federal Theatre Project (1936-1939): An Introductory Analysis and Six Representative Plays

By Lowell Swortzell | Go to book overview

BOY: Oh, no. Mr. Hiram. I'll be careful. I hope you git that money.

HIRAM: Sure I will--don't worry . . . Goodbye . . . now quietly. (The hurried and loud whisper of the BOY checks him)

BOY: Mr. Hiram! Mr. Hiram! Look out! The Sheriff . . . (The HORSE jumps back to the house as the SHERIFF enters. HIRAM drops his bundle and tries to look unconcerned. But AGGIE hasn't had time to hide properly so SHE hides between the SHERIFF's legs. The SHERIFF searches off in the distance and never looks below. HIRAM tries to shoo her away and at the same time not attract attention)

SHERIFF: Have ye found the horse, Hiram?

HIRAM (Hammering away): No, and I ain't looked for her neither.

SHERIFF (Stalks up and down): Wal, ye better git out and look for her. The horse goes with the farm.

HIRAM: Look for her yerself, ye mean . . . cuss.

SHERIFF: Brown and I have been looking for her. But I can't find her. I even looked in the woods. (Turns to HIRAM) But I'm not through. I'll look in every part of this country and ask everybody I see. I git the horse, d'ye understand? (HIRAM bangs harder. The SHERIFF turns to BOY) Did ye see Aggie? (HE shakes his head. The SHERIFF turns to the audience) Anybody out there see where the horse ran away to? (THEY answer no. AGGIE tips her imaginary hat to them) I don't see her there. But I'll find her yet. Ye won't put any of yer fool stunts over on me, Hiram. (As HE walks off the HORSE kicks him and ducks quickly. HE looks down but sees nothing and goes off, mumbling. HIRAM peers off to see that HE is really gone. HE calls AGGIE out, shakes his head at her playfulness)

HIRAM: Ye fool horse, ye. He might have seen ye. And then where'd ye be? Don't ye know we got to hurry. There ain't no time for fooling. Now come on, we got to go to New York before dark. (THEY go off, the BOY hurrying them)

BOY: Hurry! Hurry!

BLACKOUT


Scene Two

Corner of 7th Avenue and 135th Street, New York City. The harassed POI.ICEMAN directs the traffic. First the pedestrians and then the cars. The PEOPLE are many and rushed. ONE WOMAN with her dog starts to cross before the signal and is sent back by the POLICEMAN.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Six Plays for Young People from the Federal Theatre Project (1936-1939): An Introductory Analysis and Six Representative Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.