Six Plays for Young People from the Federal Theatre Project (1936-1939): An Introductory Analysis and Six Representative Plays

By Lowell Swortzell | Go to book overview

(LAWYER reenters followed by WAITER who goes to FARMER)

WAITER: Brace up, Sir. Don't worry. There's going to be justice done. FARMER: Don't look that way to me, Son. Justice seems to hev grown a mite peaked since last I came to town.

WAITER: Everything's all right. He's a lawyer. He's going to defend you.

FARMER: Hmm -- say -- he don't look able to defend hisself.

LAWYER: I beg of you -- don't be influenced by circumstantial evidence. It's often deceptive. Micky Mouthpiece is my name, Sir. A man of brains -- not brawn. I know all about your case.

WAITER (Excitedly): He listened while he was hiding behind his newspaper. He's smart. He told me to join a union -- and now the Landlord will have to pay me more -- and I'll have shorter hours -- and I won't be kicked around -- and --

FARMER: Glad to hear it, Son. But what about this court business tomorrow? I can't pay that money. It would ruin me.

LAWYER: You won't have to pay a cent if you give me leave to act for you.

FARMER: Wat -- reckon I can't be any worse off than I am now.

LAWYER: Then that's settled. I'll be in court tomorrow morning. In the meantime I'm going out to get a sandwich.

CURTAIN


Scene Three

The County Court. Witness box, Bible, etc. JUDGE seated on bench.

JUDGE (Raps with gavel three times): How does that sound?

POLICEMAN: Like swate music. Sure and you haven't lost your technicky.

TUDGE: Good. It's been so long since I've tried a case that I've almost forgotten how. (Preens himself) Do I look all right?

POLICEMAN: Don't worry, yet Honor, ye look fine.

JUDGE:' Would you mind telling me once more just what happened. Don't leave out any of the details, no matter how unimportant they seem to you.

-116-

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