The Desert Fox in Normandy: Rommel's Defense of Fortress Europe

By Samuel W. Mitcham Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
"A PITILESS DESTINY"

At 4:00 P.M. on July 17, 1944, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel left the headquarters of Sepp Dietrich's I SS Panzer Corps at St. Pierre-sur- Dives on his way back to La Roche-Guyon. He never reached it. What happened to him was not unusual: It happened to thousands of German soldiers on the Western Front in 1944 and 1945. On a secondary road from Livarot to Vimoutiers, his car was jumped by a pair of Allied fighter-bombers. His driver, Corporal Daniel, stepped on the accelerator and headed for a little side road about 300 yards ahead, which would have given them some protection. Before they could reach it, however, the leading aircraft--which was only a few feet above the ground-- pulled to within 500 yards and opened fire. Rommel was hit in the temple and cheekbone, suffered a triple skull fracture, and lost consciousness immediately. Major Neuhaus was hit in the holster with such force that it broke his pelvis. Another shell from the Allied cannon shattered Daniel's left shoulder and arm, causing him to lose control of the car. As Captain Helmuth Lang ( Rommel's aide) and Sergeant Holke (his spotter) jumped out, the car struck a tree stump on the left, skidded to the right, and turned over in the ditch. Rommel was thrown out and lay unconscious in the road, about 20 yards behind the car. 1

The field marshal's left cheekbone was destroyed, he had numerous shell splinters and fragments in his head, his left eye was injured, his skull badly fractured in four places, and his temple penetrated. It was 45 minutes before Captain Lang and Sergeant Holke could get him to a French religious hospital. At first it was thought that there was no chance of him living through such serious wounds.

Later that night the Desert Fox, still unconscious, was transferred to the Luftwaffe hospital at Bernay, about 25 miles away. His driver, Corporal Daniel, also unconscious, was transported with him. That

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Desert Fox in Normandy: Rommel's Defense of Fortress Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Atlantic Wall 1
  • Chapter 2 - D-Day 57
  • Chapter 3 - Holding Fast 93
  • Chapter 4 - Cherbourg 129
  • Chapter 5 - The Crumbling Fortress 141
  • Chapter 6 - A pitiless Destiny 179
  • Appendix I - Table of Equivalent Ranks 203
  • Appendix II - German Staff Abbreviations 205
  • Appendix III - Characteristics of Opposing Tanks 207
  • Appendix IV - Rommel's Schedule, March 23-June 4, 1944 209
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 229

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.