Legal Services for the Poor: A Comparative and Contemporary Analysis of Interorganizational Politics

By Mark Kessler | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
This quote appears in Warren George, "Development of the Legal Services Corporation," Cornell Law Review 61 ( 1976): p. 685.
2.
Spiro Agnew, "What's Wrong with the Legal Services Program," American Bar Association Journal 58 ( 1972): p. 931.
3.
Stephen Wermiel, "Govermment-Paid Legal Services for the Poor Stir Local Contention and Growing National Debate," Wall Street Journal, June 12, 1981. Quoted in Anthony Champagne, "Legal Services: A Program in Need of Assistance," in Anthony Champagne and Edward J. Harpham, The Attack on the Welfare State (Prospect Heights, Illinois: Waveland Press Inc., 1984), p. 143.
4.
This quote appears in Roger C. Cramton, "Crisis in Legal Services for the Poor," Villanova Law Review 26 ( 1981): p. 531.
5.
There is a substantial literature on these controversies. Among the best works are Harry Stumpf, Community Politics and Legal Services ( Beverly Hills, California: Sage Publications, 1975); Warren George, "Development of the Legal Services Corporation," Cornell Law Review 61 ( 1976): pp. 681- 730; Phillip J. Hannon, "The Murphy Amendments and the Response of the Bar: An Accurate Test of Political Strength," NLADA Briefcase ( April 1970): pp. 163-169, and "From Politics to Reality: An Historical Perspective of the Legal Services Corporation," Emory Law Journal 25 (Summer 1976): pp. 639-654; Walter Karabian, "Legal Services for the Poor: Some Political Observations," University of San Francisco Law Review 6 ( April 1972): pp. 253-265; Note, "The Legal Services Corporation: Curtailing Political Interference," Yale Law Journal 81 ( 1971): pp. 231-286; Lawrence A. Sullivan , "Law Reform and the Legal Services Crisis," California Law Review 59 ( 1971): pp. 1-28; and Jerome B. Falk and Stuart R. Pollack, "Political Interference with Public Lawyers: The CRLA Controversy and the Future of Legal Services," Hastings Law Journal 24 ( March 1973): pp. 599-646.
6.
Stuart A. Scheingold, The Politics of Rights: Lawyers, Public Policy, and Political Change ( New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 1974), chapters 2-3.
7.
Ibid., p. 13.
8.
Ibid., p. 14.
9.
After reviewing the literature, Scheingold concludes that blacks and other minorities are less likely to believe that all are treated as equals by the legal system. See Scheingold, The Politics of Rights, chapter 5.
10.
For a discussion of the philosophical origins of the notion of formal legal equality and its influence on western legal systems, see Mauro Cappelletti , James Gordley, and Earl Johnson Jr., Toward Equal Justice: A Comparative Study of Legal Aid in Modern Societies (Dobbs Ferry, New York:

-12-

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Legal Services for the Poor: A Comparative and Contemporary Analysis of Interorganizational Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figure and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - Toward a Theory of Legal Activity 17
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - The Operating Environment of Legal Services Programs 33
  • Notes 43
  • 4 - Suburban Legal Services: Constraints on Poverty Lawyers 45
  • Notes 62
  • 5 - Metro City Legal Services: Freedom to Pursue Law Reform 63
  • Notes 85
  • 6 - The Lawyers 87
  • Notes 104
  • 7 - The Organizational Context 107
  • Notes 122
  • 8 - The Interorganizational Politics of Legal Activity 125
  • Notes 138
  • 9 - Legal Services and Equal Justice 141
  • Notes 149
  • Appendix a Methodology 151
  • Notes 157
  • Appendix B Research Instruments 159
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 185
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