Legal Services for the Poor: A Comparative and Contemporary Analysis of Interorganizational Politics

By Mark Kessler | Go to book overview

liberal orientation in their political views, their political values do not translate necessarily into legal activity that seeks basic changes in American society.


NOTES
1.
See Barbara A. Curran, Katherine J. Rosich, Clara N. Carson, and Mark C. Puccetti, The Lawyer Statistical Report: A Statistical Profile of the U.S. Legal Profession in the 1980s ( Chicago, Illinois: American Bar Foundation, 1985), pp. 22-23.
2.
Joel F. Handler, Ellen Jane Hollingsworth, and Howard S. Erlanger, Lawyers and the Pursuit of Legal Rights ( New York: Academic Press, 1978), pp. 136-137. My sample of attorneys is neither national nor random. Comparisons between lawyers in my sample and the national sample are drawn for the purpose of suggesting possible trends, rather than providing conclusive evidence of them.
3.
Robert G. Meadow and Carrie Menkel-Meadow, "The Origins of Political Commitment: Background Factors and Ideology Among Legal Services Attorneys," paper presented at the annual meeting of the Law and Society Association, Toronto, Canada, June 3, 1982, p. 10.
4.
Of course, it is somewhat arbitrary to categorize certain institutions as "prestigious." I have used a standard list of institutions considered to be of the highest quality in other social science research.
5.
Elite law schools are those most commonly cited among the top five in the country. Prestigious law schools are those rated consistently in the top fifteen, but not among the top five. The placement of institutions into these categories may be validated by examining ratings in Elliot M. Epstein, Jerome Shostak, and Lawrence M. Troy, Barrons' Guide to Law School ( Woodbury, New York: Barron's Educational Series, Inc., 1980). The distinction between elite and prestigious law schools is used and discussed in John P. Heinz and Edward 0. Laumann, Chicago Lawyers: The Social Structure of the Bar ( New York: Russell Sage Foundation and American Bar Foundation, 1982).
6.
Handler et al., Lawyers and the Pursuit of Legal Rights, pp. 142-143.
8.
See the discussion of judicial background research in Jerome R. Corsi , Judicial Politics: An Introduction ( Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1984), pp. 263-265.
9.
On the influence of career ambitions on poverty lawyer behavior, see Jack Katz, Poor People's Lawyers in Transition ( New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1982).
10.
Because of their ambitions to practice privately, lawyers depended

-104-

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Legal Services for the Poor: A Comparative and Contemporary Analysis of Interorganizational Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figure and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - Toward a Theory of Legal Activity 17
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - The Operating Environment of Legal Services Programs 33
  • Notes 43
  • 4 - Suburban Legal Services: Constraints on Poverty Lawyers 45
  • Notes 62
  • 5 - Metro City Legal Services: Freedom to Pursue Law Reform 63
  • Notes 85
  • 6 - The Lawyers 87
  • Notes 104
  • 7 - The Organizational Context 107
  • Notes 122
  • 8 - The Interorganizational Politics of Legal Activity 125
  • Notes 138
  • 9 - Legal Services and Equal Justice 141
  • Notes 149
  • Appendix a Methodology 151
  • Notes 157
  • Appendix B Research Instruments 159
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 185
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