The Feminist Encyclopedia of French Literature

By Eva Martin Sartori; Colette H. Winn et al. | Go to book overview

Graville, Mme de Lignolles, Jacqueline de Miremont, Suzanne de Nervèze, Anne Picardet, Hélène de Surgères, and many others who protected themselves by anonymity and by avoidance of publication. How much unpublished writing have we lost? How much more remains uncovered in private and municipal archives? It is our hope that this important task will be pursued by the new generation of scholars.

Colette H. Winn


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Primary Texts

Laé, Louise. Oeuvres complètes. Ed. François Rigolot. Paris: Flammarion, 1986.

Roches, Dames des. Les Oeuvres. Ed. Anne R. Larsen. Geneva: Droz, 1993.


Secondary Texts

Berriot-Salvadore, Evelyne. La Femme dans la société française de la Renaissance. Geneva: Droz, 1990.

Burkhardt, Jacob. Civilisation de la Renaissance en Italie. 3 vols. Trans. H. Schmitt, reviewed and corrected by Robert Klein. Paris: Librairie Plon et Club du meilleur livre, 1958. 2: 343-51.

Davis, Natalie Zemon. Society and Culture in Early Modern France. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1979.

Keating, Clark L. Studies on the Literary Salon in France (1550-1615). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1941.

Kelly-Gadol, Joan. "Did Women Have a Renaissance?" In Becoming Visible: Women in European History. Ed. Renate Bridenthal and Claudia Koonz. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977. 138-164.

Larsen, Anne R. "'Un Honneste Passetems': Strategies of Legitimation in French Renaissance Women's Prefaces." In Ecrire au féminin à la Renaissance: Problèmes et perspectives. Ed. François Rigolot. L'Esprit Créateur 30, no. 4 ( 1990): 11-22.

Lazard, Madeleine. Images littéraires de la femme à la Renaissance. Paris: PUF, 1985.

Lerner, Gerda. The Creation of Feminist Consciousness from the Middle Ages to Eighteen-Seventy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

Maclean, Ian. The Renaissance Notion of Woman: A Study in the Fortunes of Scholasticism and Medical Science in European Intellectual Life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980.

Rose, Mary-Beth, ed. Women in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1986.

Sealy, Robert J. The Palace Academy of Henry III. Geneva: Droz, 1981.

Wiesner, Merry E. Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.


SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

The seventeenth century saw a substantial increase in the number of women writing and an even greater increase in the number of women publishing* their work. The development of the salons integrated women to an unprecedented extent into the literary life of the times and made "women's taste" a factor to

-xx-

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The Feminist Encyclopedia of French Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Note x
  • A Feminist History of French Literature xi
  • Bibliography xv
  • Bibliography xx
  • Bibliography xxiii
  • Bibliography xxvi
  • Bibliography xxx
  • Bibliography xxxv
  • A 3
  • B 34
  • C 72
  • D 137
  • E 171
  • F 195
  • G 223
  • H 250
  • I 266
  • J 275
  • K 280
  • L 287
  • M 333
  • O 400
  • P 404
  • Q 447
  • R 451
  • S 483
  • T 524
  • V 542
  • W 554
  • Y 563
  • Appendix A: General Bibliography 567
  • Appendix B: Chronology of French Women Writers 573
  • Index 585
  • Contributors 631
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