The International Movie Industry

By Gorham Kindem | Go to book overview

10 Hungary

Beverly James

The first public showings of moving pictures in Hungary coincided with the nation's 1896 millennial celebration of the Magyar conquest of the Carpathian Basin. The festivities commemorating the nation's economic, scientific, and cultural achievements included a Millenary Exhibition that displayed the technical wonders of an industrializing world, Edison's kinetoscope among them. Some of the earliest film footage shot in Hungary was that of Emperor Franz Joseph opening the exhibition. While Hungarians were justifiably proud of their accomplishment, the organizers of the festivities, as well as public officials and the press, overplayed their pride, using the millennium to popularize the illusion of a powerful Hungarian Empire and to divert attention from domestic unrest.1 Hungary had finally achieved a measure of independence from the Habsburgs with the compromise of 1867, which established the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but Austria was the dominant partner in the alliance.

Moreover, the compromise actually worsened the living and working conditions for the average Hungarian. The Hungarian ruling class was given the authority to deal with the state's internal affairs, and they used this power to suppress growing discontent among national minorities as well as the lower classes.2 In the period leading up to World War I, national minorities constituted over 50 percent of the population but held only 8 seats in the 421-member Hungarian parliament. About 4,000 people out of a population of 18 million owned over half the land, and more than 5.5 million people owned no land at all.3 Thus, at a time when the elite were celebrating the millennium through balls, parades, and ribbon-cutting ceremonies, Romanians, Slovakians, Croatians, Serbs, and Slovenes were pressing for political and cultural self-determination, and both urban workers and rural peasants were agitating for a more equitable economic order.

This is the backdrop against which the Hungarian film industry evolved. As a highly public and ideologically charged form of expression, film in Hun

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Movie Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Japan 7
  • 3 - China 22
  • 4 - India 36
  • 5 - Australia 60
  • 6 - Israel 78
  • 7 - Iran 99
  • 8 - Senegal 117
  • 9 - South Africa 140
  • 10 - Hungary 165
  • 11 - Soviet Union/Russia 178
  • 12 - France 195
  • 13 - Germany 206
  • 14 - Italy 223
  • 15 - Great Britain 234
  • 16 - Sweden 247
  • 17 - Brazil 257
  • 18 - Mexico 273
  • 19 - Canada 292
  • 20 - United States 309
  • 21 - Conclusion 331
  • Index 403
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.