Coca-Colonization and the Cold War: The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria after the Second World War

By Reinhold Wagnleitner; Diana M. Wolf | Go to book overview

3
United States Press Politics in Austria

"A Fine Propaganda Medium": The Establishment of Newspapers and Magazines

All news is views.

-- George Gerbner, Ideological Perspective and Political Tendencies in News Reporting ( 1964)

The control, reform, and reorganization of Austria's press doubtless stood at the center of (cultural) political reorientation programs of the victorious powers. All four allies founded newspapers and issued licenses to politically acceptable publishers. However, U.S. information officers were far more successful than the press officers of the other nations in significantly influencing--directly and indirectly--the Austrian media landscape. They did so not only in the short term, as U.S. press reforms affected Austrian media in many important areas in the long run. This was a result of more intensive planning and material superiority as well as of the internal structure of the Austrian media. Therefore, the great majority of the Austrian press--the most important intensifier of opinions during the first years of the Cold War--became tools for achieving the goals of U.S. information politics.1

In spite of its initial total monitoring, the control of the Austrian press was less radical than the plans for the press in Germany. Nevertheless, the first and foremost goal of American press officers was to expropriate all information apparatuses, to rid them of their Nazi functionaries, and to revamp the function of the journalists and the basic workings of the entire press system according to the U.S. model. During the first phase of occupation, the concept for surmounting all fascist remnants certainly also included the former representatives of Austro-fascism. However, these more radical plans were quickly dropped. Such was the case, for example, in the appointment of Gustav A. Canaval, a former chief editor of the newspaper of the Austrian Sturmscharen Sturm über Österreich, as copublisher and senior editor of the Salzburger Nachrichten. U.S. plans to exclude former Austro-fascists faced total opposition from the ÖVP leadership and the Catholic church and had to be abandoned.2

Yet another, more important point was the banishing of all German influence in the new press, or the "de-Germanization" of the entire information machinery. This goal was achieved in the area of personnel. If we look, how-

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coca-Colonization and the Cold War: The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria after the Second World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 367

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.