Soviet Policy toward East Germany Reconsidered: The Postwar Decade

By Ann L. Phillips | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The literature on the breakdown of the alliance is voluminous. The ongoing controversy over the interpretation of events can only be touched upon here. Some of the more interesting works on the subject include: Daniel Yergin A Shattered Peace. The Origins of the Cold War and the National Security State ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977); Joyce Kolko and Gabriel Kolko , The Limits of Power: The World and United States Foreign Policy, 1945-1954 ( New York: Harper & Row, 1972); Boris Meissner, Russland, die Westmächte und Deutschland: Die so sowietische Deutschlandpolitik, 1943- 1953 ( Hamburg: H. H. Nölke Verlag, 1953); Herbert Feis, Churchill Roosevelt Stalin ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1957); W. Averell Harriman, Special Envoy to Churchill and Stalin, 1941-1946 ( New York: Random House, 1975); John Lewis Gaddis, The United States and the Origins of the Cold War ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1972); Ivanovich Orlik, Imperialisticheskiye Derzhavy i Vostochnaya Evropa, 1945-1965 ( Moscow: Academy of Sciences, 1968). Orlik provides a valuable source for a Soviet perspective.
2.
A Decade of American Foreign Policy: Basic Documents, 1941-49 ( New York: Greenwood Press, 1968), p. 10 (hereafter cited as Basic Documents).
3.
Diane Shaver Clemens, Yalta ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1970), pp. 40-42. Philip Mosely, a representative to the European Advisory Commission (EAC), attributes this to the deep differences between the President's political and military advisors. Mosely, The Kremlin and World Politics ( New York: Vintage Books, 1960), pp. 158-59, 202. Secretary of State Cordell Hull recounts in his memoirs that EAC functions were limited to the terms of surrender and plans for their execution, reflecting the U.S. preference for delaying peace arrangements until the end of the war. Hull, The Memoirs of Cordell Hull, 2 vols. ( New York: The Macmillan Co., 1948), 2:1642.
4.
The Italian armistice was negotiated between the United States, Great Britain, and the Supreme Allied Commander of the Mediterranean without Soviet participation. The State Department prophetically protested this, saying it would allow the Soviets to

-46-

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Soviet Policy toward East Germany Reconsidered: The Postwar Decade
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - Germany, 1945-1949 13
  • Conclusions 43
  • Notes 46
  • 3 - The Question of Exploitation 65
  • Conclusions 99
  • Notes 102
  • 4 - Building to a Crisis 115
  • Conclusions 135
  • Notes 137
  • 5 - Transition to Support 149
  • Conclusions 180
  • Notes 182
  • 6 - The Gdr: A Special Case in East Europe 197
  • Conclusions 209
  • Notes 211
  • 7 - Conclusions 215
  • Appendix a Protocol of Proceedings of the Crimea Conference 223
  • Appendix B Protocol of Proceedings of the Potsdam Conference 225
  • Appendix C Reparations 227
  • Appendix D Summation of Soviet Credits to the Gdr, 1945-1960 231
  • Selected Bibliography 233
  • Index 257
  • About the Author 263
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