Historical Dictionary of the French Revolution 1789-1799 - Vol. 2

By Samuel F. Scott; Barry Rothaus | Go to book overview

N

NANCY, MUTINY OF . See MUTINY OF NANCY.

NAPOLEON 1 . See BONAPARTE, NAPOLEON.

NARBONNE-LARA, LOUIS, COMTE DE ( 1755-1813), general, diplomat, minister of war. Born in Colorno, Parma, to a maid of honor of Louis XV's daughter, Elisabeth, Narbonne was the son of either a Spanish nobleman, F. de Narbonne-Lara or, as was alleged, of Louis XV himself. He early returned to France with his mother, who became lady-in-waiting to Madame Adélaïde, eldest daughter of Louis XV, and was brought up at court until he attended the collège de Juilly, where he acquired his formal education, proved proficient in European languages, and specialized in jurisprudence and diplomacy. He was a popular young man, graceful and amiable, at ease in good society, where he was much favored. By virtue of his literary taste and linguistic facility, Narbonne was equally at home among distinguished men of letters and among courtiers and politicians. Through C.-G. Vergennes he had access to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where he continued to pursue his interest in foreign relations and diplomacy. Being a partisan of J. Necker, Narbonne naturally attracted the friendship of Necker's daughter, Madame de Staël, a relationship that united the worlds of literature and politics.

Narbonne chose the army as his profession and by age twenty-five was a colonel, successively, of the Angoumois and Piedmont regiments. In 1790, after the outbreak of Revolution, he was named commandant of National Guard units in the department of the Doubs ( 1790). Relying on persuasion more than force and discipline, he found it difficult to maintain order in the untranquil early months, of the Revolution, and he consequently found himself under attack, particularly in the radical press. By preference, he was loyally and sincerely attached to the House of Bourbon, and as a trustworthy monarchist, he was selected for the delicate task of accompanying Louis XVI's aunts, troubled

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Historical Dictionary of the French Revolution 1789-1799 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations of Journals in References xv
  • M 615
  • N 703
  • O 731
  • P 739
  • Q 799
  • R 805
  • S 859
  • T 925
  • U 989
  • V 995
  • W 1019
  • X 1027
  • Y 1031
  • Z 1035
  • Chronology: Principal Events of the French Revolution 1037
  • Index 1045
  • About the Editors 1145
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