In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images, and the Ironies of Creativity

By Thomas G. West | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
Slow Words, Quick Images: An Overview
1.
Faraday, quoted in Tyndall, Discoverer, 1868, pp. 77-78. The preceding paragraph relies heavily on Tyndall's description. It is perhaps a foreshadowing of the core idea of our current narrative that Faraday continues this passage, "How often are the things we fear and esteem as troubles made to become blessings to those who are led to receive them with humility and patience." ( Jones, Life and Letters, 1870, p. 152.)
2.
A few examples of studies drawn from the literature of creativity are Hadamard, Psychology of Invention, 1945; Beveridge, Scientific Investigation, 1957; Koestler, Act of Creation, 1964; Braithwaite, Scientific Explanation, 1968; Storr, Dynamics of Creation, 1972; Arieti, Magic Synthesis, 1976; and Judson, Search for Solutions, 1980. A sampling of professional and popular surveys dealing with different forms of creativity and including specific consideration of the two hemispheres of the brain are Bogen and Bogen, "The Other Side . . . Creativity," 1969; Blakeslee, The Right Brain, 1980; Springer, Left Brain, Right Brain, 1981; Ehrenwald, Anatomy of Genius, 1984; and Edwards, Artist Within, 1986. A series of articles by the Bogens and others reviewing recent research concerning the two hemispheres and creativity can be found in the September 1988 issue of Psychiatric Clinics of North America, pp. 287-491.
3.
Geschwind and Galaburda, Cerebral Lateralization, 1987, pp. 1-4. Some of the associations proposed by Geschwind and his colleagues are being confirmed by some recent studies, while other evidence is more mixed. In a recent review of the evidence, Galaburda focused on what is known as the "testosterone hypotheses," the intrauterine action of the male hormone testosterone during gestation and its relationship to non-righthandedness, immune disorders, and learning disabilities, including dyslexia. To date, several studies (although not fully representative) have provided evidence that there are links between learning disorders and non- righthandedness as well as between learning disorders and immune disease--while

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