In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images, and the Ironies of Creativity

By Thomas G. West | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to thank the many individuals who have encouraged and supported this research through their enthusiasm, comments, suggestions, and constructive criticism. I have very much appreciated the oral and written comments on various draft chapters. I have found especially helpful the stories from personal experience and other suggestions that many have provided. A few of these illustrated some important point very well and eventually came to be used in the text.

I am especially grateful to those professionals and specialists, whether physician, speech therapist, computer scientist, physicist, psychologist, neurologist, or mathematician, who took the time to read sections of the manuscript, helping me to avoid the many errors that the non- specialist writer risks by dipping into so much unfamiliar territory. Of course, I alone am responsible for any errors that remain. I would further like to thank those specialists in the new field of computer graphics who were so generous with their time in interviews, telephone conversations, and background discussions.

I want to express my deep appreciation to those dyslexics-- Eileen Simpson, Susan Hampshire, and others--who have had the courage to reveal to the public their personal experiences so that others may begin to understand.

I would especially like to express my gratitude for the work of the late Norman Geschwind and his students, who have done so much to bring a fresh perspective to the study of the neurological factors that underlie dyslexia and related difficulties and talents.

Where appropriate, specific personal communications have been credited in the reference notes. Other contributions have been more general, but no less influential. Many have contributed in ways of which they would hardly be aware.

-381-

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