Up from the Footnote: A History of Women Journalists

By Marion Marzolf | Go to book overview

1
Widow Printer to Big City Reporter

IN COLONIAL AMERICA it was "quite a common thing for widows-especially of printers, innkeepers, and traders -- to take up and carry on the husband's trade, and not uncommon for them to set up businesses of their own," observed Isaiah Thomas, himself a printer and the first historian of American journalism.


Printing in the Colonies

At one time there were as many as four colonial women printers operating in different parts of the country. The earliest was Dinah Nuthead in Maryland in 1696. Five, including Nuthead, were official printers before the War for Independence, and all but one of those also published a weekly newspaper.

Printing in the colonies was introduced in 1638 at Harvard University, and the first continuously published newspaper was established in 1704. Most early printers had to supplement their incomes by selling a variety of goods along with printed pamphlets, broadsides and commercial forms. The designation as an official printer assured regular government work.

So it was not an unimportant piece of cargo that was loaded

-1-

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Up from the Footnote: A History of Women Journalists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 2 - Sob Sister to War Correspondent 32
  • Sources Consulted 72
  • Sources Consulted 116
  • Sources Consulted 155
  • 5 - Newswoman on Camera 157
  • Sources Consulted 198
  • 7 - The Feminist Press Then and Now 219
  • Sources Consulted 247
  • 8 - Women Who Teach the Journalists 248
  • Sources Consulted 265
  • 9 - View from Europe 266
  • Sources Consulted 297
  • Index 298
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