History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 2

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX

"PEACE has been restored to Kansas," said Buchanan in a jubilant speech after the October victory. "As a Pennsylvanian, I rejoice that this good work has been accomplished by two sons of our good old mother State, God bless her! We have reason to be proud of Colonel Geary and General Smith.1 We shall hear no more of bleeding Kansas. There will be no more shrieks for her unhappy destiny."2 Quiet continued, and on November 7th Geary, telegraphed that he had made "an extended tour of observation through a large portion of this territory." He was glad to report that "the general peace of the territory remains unimpaired, confidence is being gradually restored, business is resuming its ordinary channels, citizens are preparing for winter, and there is a readiness among the good people of all parties to sustain my administration."3

At first the free-State people did not look upon Geary with favor; they were disposed to regard him as worse than Shannon.4 But when it appeared that his intention was to do justice, the influential portion of the free-State party gave him a cordial support. Lane and John Brown had left the territory, and the leadership fell again to Robin

____________________
1
General Smith was put in command of the United States troops in Kansas, in the place of Colonel Sumner transferred. He was a pro-slavery man, but his prejudices did not interfere with a faithful and ready discharge of duty. See Geary and Kansas, Gihon, pp. 92, 298.
2
Curtis, vol. ii. p. 176.
3
Message and Documents, 1856-57, part i. p. 172.
4
Topeka correspondence of the New York Tribune, Sept. 25th.

-193-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents of the Second Volume iii
  • Chapter VII 1
  • Chapter VIII 125
  • Chapter IX 193
  • Chapter X 258
  • Chapter XI 373
  • Chapter XII 459
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