History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 2

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X

IN the summer and fall of 1857, the prospects of the Republican party did not seem bright. There was a natural reaction from the high enthusiasm which characterized the campaign of the preceding year. The Tribune argued elaborately to prove that the Republican party was not dead, but admitted that the failure to achieve success in 1856 had caused a dropping-off of those who had gone into the movement, thinking it would carry the country and give them a chance at the offices.1 In the Northwest, the outlook for the new party was especially gloomy.2 The result of the fall elections all over the North was discouraging. A large falling-off of the Republican vote, due to apathy and the engrossing attention caused by the financial stringency, was nearly everywhere noted. It is undeniable that, until it became known that Douglas intended to oppose the policy of the administration, the future looked very unpromising for the Republicans. But after the contest was fairly entered upon, a general cheerfulness might be observed in Republican circles. Senator Wade wrote to Pike: "My opinion is that the end of the old Locofoco party is at hand. It gives 'signs of woe that all is lost.' They are hopelessly broken and must die. The party is in the same fix that the old Whig party was in on the repeal of the compromise -- divided in the middle, North and South. I hope to be able, during the session, to preach its funeral sermon."3 No mat-

____________________
1
See New York Weekly Tribune, Aug. 6th.
2
Life of Douglas, Sheahan, p. 383.
3
Jan. 10th, 1858, First Blows of the Civil War, p. 378.

-258-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the McKinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents of the Second Volume iii
  • Chapter VII 1
  • Chapter VIII 125
  • Chapter IX 193
  • Chapter X 258
  • Chapter XI 373
  • Chapter XII 459
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